Archive for September, 2012

Wine Investment Advice

September 29th, 2012 by Nicolette Bailey

If you had purchased $1,000.00 of Nortel stock one year ago, it would now be worth $49.00.

With Enron, you would have had $16.50 left of the original $1,000.00.

With WorldCom, you would have had less than $5.00 left.

If you had purchased $1,000 of Delta Air Lines stock, you would have $49.00 left.

But, if you had purchased $1,000.00 worth of wine one year ago, drunk all the wine, then turned in the bottles for the recycling REFUND, you would have had $214.00.

Based on the above, the best current investment advice is to drink and recycle.

 

 

Coming of Harvest

September 22nd, 2012 by Nicolette Bailey

It’s beginning to look a lot like harvest, everywhere you go.

The air is crisper. The leaves in the trees are turning color. The grapes have changed color. Now it’s a waiting game, and fervent hoping that the good weather continues. We have had great weather for the most part this year with the timing of bud break, bloom and veraison, and heat units are tracking very similarly to 2008. The optimal weather in October was the pinnacle of a great 2008 harvest, and so far everything is in alignment to repeat that good fortune this year. The weather looks great for the rest of September – maybe a little warmer than normal, which will ripen the grapes a little faster – and we’re crossing our fingers for next month.

We will most likely harvest our young block of grapes from the Camelot block sometime in the first week of October. They are at about 20 brix (20% sugar) right now and typically increase by about 1.5 brix per week when the weather is good – sunny and dry. Our target is 23 brix. The pinot gris in the Aspen block will most likely be ready 10 days later, followed by the Natasha and Jordan blocks respectively.

Besides sugar content of the grapes, we are also looking at pH and total acidity to determine their readiness. We are also evaluating the maturity of the grapes; how liquid the pupl of the fruit is, how brown the seeds are, and how the flavors are coming in.

Stay tuned!

 

 

Oregon Sustainability

September 15th, 2012 by Nicolette Bailey

We Oregonians take pride in our efforts (and results) in protecting and preserving the environment. We believe there are alternative ways to doing things that will have less negative impact on the delicate balance of nature. The wine industry, because of our dependence on that balance of nature, is a leader in taking action and creating awareness around this important issue.

Most of us in the wine industry who farm organically, sustainably, and biodynamically do so because we believe it is necessary to protect the environment, improve the health of the land and the vineyards, and to sustain the balance of nature. Many of us also believe that it improves the health and the quality of the fruit we harvest, allowing us to make better wine.

We do not practice these methods as a marketing ploy.  In fact, market research suggests that the general wine consumer does not reward wineries by buying those wines farmed and produced sustainably over others.  We take this path because it is the right thing to do.

Then why is important to identify our farming practices with certification logos on our labels and in our marketing? Because we feel it is important to continue to raise the awareness level of our environmental impact, and ways in which we can reduce it.  That is why we have not only organic certification, but also salmon safe certification, low impact viticultural certification, Oregon Sustainable certification, and so on.

We are proud of the small role we play in preserving our planet!

 

 

Team Lucy to Dominate Carlton Crush

September 8th, 2012 by Nicolette Bailey

The stomp team proudly representing Youngberg Hill is training with daily climbs up the vineyard slopes, readying for the Carlton Crush! They have been training since the main “Lucy Event” back in May, which included the Lucy Look-alike Contest. From that we culled our four Lucy beauties, ready to take on all comers in the first annual Carlton Crush stomping competition. While the practice of crushing the grapes is typically not done with bare feet here in the New World, the idea has us all flash back to one of the most popular Lucy episodes. In fact, in Oregon, and especially concerning the Pinot Noir grape, the concept of crush applies more to the time of year and harvest than it does to what actually happens to the grapes. Because Pinot Noir skins are thin and fragile, we take great care in keeping the grapes whole and not bruising the skins prior to fermentation. Therefore, the idea of crushing Pinot Noir grapes makes most of us winemakers cringe. But harvest, otherwise known as crush, is a great time of celebration, and Carlton Crush is one of many celebrations that will take place during the month of September. We will also be hosting our annual harvest dinner on September 29th up on The Hill to celebrate the season’s harvest, to share the bounty with guests and neighbors, and to thank those that helped all season long. So whether you enjoy wine, beautiful weather, fun and games, or are just looking for something different to do, come out to Carlton and watch as Team Lucy begins its reign as the #1 stomp team at the Carlton Crush!

It’s All About the Weather

September 2nd, 2012 by Nicolette Bailey

As farmers of wine grapes, like most other farmers, our main topic of discussion is, more often than not, the weather. Fortunately, the weather in the Willamette Valley this year has been more cooperative  than in most of the country. Coming from the Midwest, we know what hot, dry weather can do to crops, and we sympathize with our fellow farmers who are currently experiencing drought conditions there.

We are getting a little heat ourselves right now, and this summer was slated is to be about 5 degrees above normal.  This type of weather and humidity levels are conducive to  grape growing in the valley. It was an earlier, warmer spring and the weather during bud break, bloom, and fruit set was favorable.  Humidity has been low, so mildew pressure has been less problematic.

So, what does it mean for this year’s vintage?  It’s too early to determine.  There are still two and a half months of growing season AND weather that could either destroy the crop or make it the best vintage ever. Not to mention other natural influences like birds, that love to pick the grapes before we do!

The grapes will begin “veraison” in the next couple of weeks, which is the beginning of the ripening process when the grapes turn color. September is when we hope for sunny, mild weather to ripen the fruit.  Too much sunshine and heat will result in higher sugars, bigger fruit, and potential raisoning. Not enough of these, and we may have to intervene to get suitable fruit.

But Mother Nature is in charge now, and we are patient and watchful, and optimistic.