Message in a Bottle

April 13th, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

message in a bottleGenerally wine lovers cherish fond memories of the occasion for which they opened a particular bottle of wine.  Whether a gathering of close friends, an enchanting gala, or a quiet evening by the fire, we can think back to what made that time meaningful.

For me as a winemaker, I am transported back to the year that wine was created.  Immediately after uncorking a wine, the deep aromas and first sip remind me of what was happening with our family and farm the year the grapes were grown and the wine was barreled.  Any weather anomalies we may have had that year, any especially wet or dry months, late freezes or perfect Indian summers rise to the surface.  What else happened during that summer?  Maybe a calf was born, one of our girls took their first bike ride or acted in a local theater play, we got a new loader, we lost a tote of grapes at harvest, or the birds invaded with more gusto than usual.

A singular open bottle evokes memories of the winemaking itself during that season – the evolution of the wine, whether the fermentation went fast or slow, how it tasted going into barrel, the magic of one particular barrel in the cellar, and of course the release of the vintage.  Every sip of that wine is a celebration of the life that transpired that year – both the good times and the challenges.

 

A Wine Country Spa Day

April 6th, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

spa blogI had the pleasure of being treated to a spa day at the Allison.  I was not disappointed.  It was a luxurious spa experience that provided relaxation and rejuvenation that I really needed.   It combines a day experience that is calming, relaxing and blissfully indulgent. They have a vast array of rejuvenating therapies.  I recommend doing it with a friend and planning extra time to relax onsite before and after.  Its an easy drive from Youngberg Hill and many of our guests go for a spa experience.  Now I can talk with them about the whole adventure.  This is a great treat for a few hours or even a half day when in Oregon’s Wine Country.   I am now stress free for the moment and isn’t that every woman’s wish?

 

2 Responses to “A Wine Country Spa Day”

  1. This sounds like the perfect get-a-way. Wine country, a spa and a few hours of stress relief. Do they serve wine to guests in the spa?

Do The Glasses Really Matter?

March 30th, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

wine glasses matterYes!

Wine glasses are designed for different varietals and for different reasons.  Is it necessary to use the “correct” glass every time?  No.  And probably not practical. However, there are a couple of guidelines that may help you enjoy your wines more.

A larger glass is always better, regardless of a red or white wine.  White wines typically do not need as large a bowl to aerate, but it doesn’t hurt.  It is unfortunate when wines are tasted and/or served in a small glass, because the aromas are stifled.  Red wines especially need bigger bowled glasses so they can be agitated more to open up, stir the aromatics, and warm to the occasion.

 

 

Holly, my friend

March 23rd, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

hollysmI want to tell you of a life that I adore.  I refer to Holly as the Sister you never knew you needed until she showed up.  I remember adopting Holly from the rescue shelter and from day one she was a new spirit, fun loving, crazy, childlike and kind.  She was the first to greet you with a ‘hello’.  She would take plants by the roots and pull them out of the ground then happily present it to you.  Holly’s proudest achievements were bringing you sticks, rocks, branches, bushes, and critters so you too could rejoice in her accomplishments (good or not so good).  Holly was the first to walk with you into the vineyard and stay by your side.  She kept watch over our daughters as they played around the hill and never left their side.  After seven wonderful years Holly’s leg was amputated due to a tumor.  Unfortunately, that was not enough to save her life. Now we are experiencing the painful lesson of life and loss.  Holly is now pain free and running in our hearts and minds.  Thank you, Holly, for sharing your childlike joy with us.  You will be remembered.

 

4 Responses to “Holly, my friend”

  1. Abbey Road Farm says:

    We commiserate with you and understand first hand the big whole these precious animals leave in our lives when they go to their big park in the afterlife. Hugs and kisses to the girls.
    Judi & John

  2. Wayne, Nicolette and Girls. This is a wonderful ode and tribute. I didn’t know Holly well but always felt welcomed when arriving at your Inn. This is sad, but long and fond memories for you and the girls.
    Carl

  3. Wayne & Family: I’m so sorry to hear of your loss. On my visit to your winery during WBC12, I befriended “Holly” & actually have a cute picture of her on the deck outside your tasting room. She was a beautiful dog and sounds as if she was an intrigal part of your family. Thoughts & prayers are with you & the family during this time.

  4. Lovely website! I am loving it!! Will come back again. I am bookmarking your feeds also

White in Time!

March 16th, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

white wineWith the approach of spring, warmer weather and white wine comes to mind.  We are preparing to bottle our 2012 Pinot Gris and Pinot Blanc in April.  Which is timely, because we sold out the last of our 2011′s in September.  We leave our white wines in stainless steel tanks after fermentation, then cold stabilize, and bottle.  Different from our Pinot Noir, we make our Gris and Blanc to drink young, so they will be available in May – just in time for warmer weather and sunny skies.
Come join us on the Hill for a taste of Spring!

 

To Each His Own

March 9th, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

wine is like musicWe often hear from guests in our tasting room that they don’t know how to explain what they are tasting, and therefore can’t say why they like or don’t like a wine.  I sometimes use the analogy that wine is like music – you and I may like (or dislike)the same song, but for different reasons.  The same applies to wine.  Different experiences and tastes may bring us to the same conclusion, or to two very different conclusions about a particular vintage.  It’s not always necessary to articulate why, but it IS important to realize what your particular tastes are.  That’s the joy (and benefit) of wine tasting!

 

 

I am an Oregonian!

February 23rd, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

I am an OregonianHow does one become an Oregonian?  Those of us who’ve moved here from a different state to live understand what I’m asking.  We moved here 10 years ago from Chicago and sometimes I still feel like I am not considered to be an Oregonian by some.  Oregonians are proud, easy going people, and very friendly, but like many people everywhere, some Oregonians have a hard time accepting change.  I’m still told regularly that I’m not an Oregonian.  I walk too fast and talk too fast and drive too fast.  Many things that used to drive me crazy I now accept as part of the culture, like never pumping my own gas.  I use to be  frustrated that I am not allowed to do this basic task when I have been doing it for almost 20 years.  Now I think of having a gas station attendant pump my gas as a little gift so I don’t have to get out of the car on a rainy winter day.

I’ve discovered there isn’t a magic formula for becoming an Oregonian.   I do know that you feel like one before you are one.  You can’t change Oregon, but it changes you. These days I am slowing down.  I am starting to understand small town living, look forward to talking to people on 3rd Street, and I have found that as I’ve made friends and gotten to know my neighbors, I’m not too concerned anymore about not being considered an Oregonian.  I just absolutely love living here and I can’t think of any place I would rather be than this wonderful place called Oregon.

Hey, I am an Oregonian!

~Nicolette

 

One Response to “I am an Oregonian!”

  1. Tom Vail says:

    Amen. Marion and I have a similar story. Last night, over dinner on 3rd Street, she asked me if I could think of any place in the world I would rather live. I couldn’t. Nor could she. We are so fortunate to have found this area. As Marion says, she “wakes up each morning in a park.”
    Thanks for your post – nicely put, Nicolette.

Wine & Chocolate

February 16th, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

pinsperationWine and chocolate are often paired together, particularly during this romantic time of year.  Why?  Just ask Natalie MacLean, author of Red, White and Drunk All Over:  “Wine is liquid sensuality: Its heady bouquet stimulates the appetite and its velvet caress soothes that desire. What other drink is described as both ‘voluptuous’ and ‘muscular’? And when you pair wine with the mouth-coating luxury of chocolate, the combination is impossible to resist.”

And scientifically speaking, they’re made for each other.  The acid in wine and the fat in chocolate are natural characteristics that balance the other on the palate.  The more fat in the chocolate, the more acid needed to offset it.

Also, chocolate is considered to have an “earth” characteristics, as opposed to a “fruit” characteristics.  So if you eat chocolate with a more earthy wine, you will find that they pair quite nicely.  You might often see chocolate, or cocoa, used as a descriptor for wine flavors.  Chances are that particular wine will be a pleasing complement to chocolate.  Now for the coup de grape, there are chocolatiers that make truffles infused with wine.  We have wine truffle chocolates in our Inn guest rooms to enjoy.  Heaven!

 

Pruning 101

February 9th, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

pruningIts pruning time in Oregon and all the vineyards are hard at work.  Pruning is the most important function we do for the health of the plants and the production of wine grapes.  We are not pruning solely to obtain the highest yield or get rid of the old growth, although these factors are important.  Primarily we are pruning to provide the best flow of nutrients, water, and energy from the vine through to the shoots, the leaves, and ultimately, the fruit.

So what is pruning?  For most of us who are growing Pinot Noir in the Willamette Valley, it is cutting off almost all the vegetative growth from the previous growing season.  At the end of each season, all that’s left is the stock, two fruiting canes – growing from and perpendicular to the stock, and about 14-16 shoots coming off the fruiting canes.  The beautiful canopy of leafy shade is gone, and all that remains is the skeleton of the plant.

On each plant, we will cut off both last year’s fruiting canes with all the shoots leaving only two new fruiting canes that were new shoots grown last year. The selection of which shoots to leave as the next year’s fruiting cane is critical. We choose these shoots based on how the energy and balance flow in the vine.  This may be an easy selection on one vine and a very difficult one on the next.  It is important for the health of the vine and its production to select the shoots that are going to do the best job of transferring nutrients and energy throughout the plant. This takes a trained eye and an understanding of the physiology of the vines.

Ultimately, we strive to help keep the plant in balance as it prepares to burst forth once again.  If your visiting an Oregon winery in the next few weeks ask them to show you.  We would love it!

 

 

Meet Lon (aka Tin Man)

January 26th, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

lonWe first meet Lon almost 8 years ago through his son Miles, who went to school with our daughter Natasha.  When Natasha and Miles became friends, we got to learn more about what kind of a person Lon is.  Our first thought of Lon was that he was incredibly kind.  Personally, I find that very admirable in anyone I meet, and he made an excellent impression on us right from the start.  Our second thought about Lon was that he was funny.  He isn’t one to crack jokes and be the life of the party, but he has the kind of humor that sneaks up on you when you least expect it.

Lon worked at Wells Fargo for years and when he decided to end his corporate accounting job and work with his parents at Found Objects in McMinnville, I knew he needed something more challenging.  We invited Lon to start bartending at our events this past summer.  There he shined; he kept event guests happy with his humor, worked hard, laughed a lot, and really showed us what a good person he is.  When an Innkeeping position became available, he was the perfect fit.

After a couple of weeks of cooking breakfasts at the Inn, Lon earned the nickname “Tin Man.”  He wrapped everything in aluminum foil – cookie sheets, ramekins, leftovers, you name it.  Whatever needed to be kept clean or preserved was covered in foil!  For Christmas our other Innkeeper, Becky, recycled all of the aluminum that she had used in the kitchen over a few months and crafted it into a huge ball for Lon.

Now Lon is part of the Youngberg family and we are thrilled to have him brighten up our days and those of our guests.  Becky raves about all the jokes he plays on her, and she loves getting him back.  We can’t wait for more laughter with Lon in the years to come!

~Nicolette