Archive for the ‘Yamhill Valley’ Category

McMinnville History and Geography

July 22nd, 2014 by Rachel

July History Blog- Pic 1

Settled along the Yamhill River in the Willamette Valley, McMinnville is surrounded by vineyards and walnuts. It’s geography, a mere 35 miles southwest of Portland, McMinnville has a rich and quirky history of its own.

McMinnville’s founder, William T. Newby, settled in Oregon with the first wagon train in 1843, naming the town after his hometown in Tennessee.

Incorporated in 1876, McMinnville was already the county seat for Yamhill County.

Scholarly Pursuits

Linfield College was first founded in 1858 as the Baptist College at McMinnville. After a generous gift from Frances Ross Linfield in 1922, the school was renamed. The campus is continuously expanding for the over 2,500 students seeking a small, private, and liberal arts education.

Celebrations

McMinnville is also a city that loves to celebrate. There are two major festivals rooted in local history and full of character. This year marks the 54th Annual Turkey Rama, celebrating the once lofty turkey industry in Yamhill County. The first incarnation of the festival was in 1938 as the “Pacific Coast Turkey Exhibit.” Today there are still activities, prizes and a giant turkey barbeque.

The city has also hosted its very own UFO Festival for 15 years, in honor of the alleged UFO sighting in 1950 in nearby Sheridan. The picture of the flying saucer skyrocketed in popularity after being published in McMinnville’s newspaper. The festival is the largest gathering of UFO-enthusiasts in the Pacific Northwest and is second in the country only to Roswell, New Mexico’s.

July History Blog- Pic 2Wine, of course!

Because of its location in the lush Yamhill Valley, McMinnville is a major destination for Oregon vineyards. The area’s hills allow for a great diversity in wine, even among the famous Oregon Pinot grapes. In 2005, Youngberg Hill and seven other local wineries became members of the McMinnville Winegrower’s Association, a division of the larger Willamette Valley AVA.

Embrace McMinnville’s rich history and geography with these tours and maps:

http://www.youngberghill.com/our-area/wine-driving-tour/

http://www.youngberghill.com/our-area/attractions-map/

http://www.youngberghill.com/our-area/bicycle-tour-map/

 

Yamhill Valley End of Summer Events

July 5th, 2014 by Rachel

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There is so much to do, see, taste, and enjoy in the summer months in Yamhill Valley’s rolling hills. Aside from the breathtaking sunsets and picturesque, rural scenery, the valley’s appealing town and country charm marries forward-thinking green philosophy, culture, art, local produce, first rate restaurants and wineries, music and more, to create an experience that won’t soon be forgotten.

There are so many terrific events in Yamhill Valley, making it difficult to catalogue them all, so we have compiled a list of some the area favorites to add to your itinerary:

21st Annual Brown Bag Concert Series

Starting June 26-August 14, 2014 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

At Lunchtime, come to the US Bank Plaza, on the corner of 3rd and Davis streets.

You will hear zydeco, rock and blues, and more in the 21st Annual Brown Bag Concert series — from Mike Strickland, Sky Bound Blue, Golden Bough and more.

For more information, visitdowntownmcminnville.com/events or call 503-472-3605.

Donations to the McMinnville Downtown Association’s event will be welcomed.

 

HOPE for Children Golf Tournament

July 21, 2014  Time:12:30 PM – 12:30 PM

Help us raise funds for charity health care for children in our community by playing in or sponsoring Providence Newberg Health Foundation’s Annual Golf Tournament, hosted by Integra Telecom!

A total of 288 golfers from around the country will enjoy a nourishing lunch, vie for prizes in various contests and unwind over a fantastic dinner. Plus, golfers will get to meet some very special children whose lives are transformed by support they receive from the HOPE for Children Fund.

 

Brews & BBQ Event in Newberg

July 25, 2014 – July 26, 2014

Brews & BBQ returns to Newberg! In conjunction with the Old Fashioned Festival, Brews and BBQ will be held July 25th and 26th on the corner of Howard and 1st Street.

For more information, visit the Chehalem Valley Chamber’s event page here…

 

The 28th Annual International Pinot Noir Competition

July 25 – 27, 2014.

In McMinnville, nestled in the oak grove on the lawn of Linfield’s beautifully appointed historic campus,  relax and  sip world renowned Pinot Noir and enjoy the very best in northwest cuisine while  learning  from the luminaries of  the food and wine world in a three day event that wine legend Jancis Robinson has described as “one of the most enjoyable wine weekends in the world .”

Register Online or by phone at 800-775-4762.

 

Walnut City Music Festival

August 16, 2014

Come to McMinnville’s Granary District  from noon to midnight and enjoy the musical stylings of bands like Radiation City, Keaton Collective, McDougall, The Weather Machine, The Jackalope Saints, The Hill Dogs, Sky Bound Blue, River Twain, Ships to Roam, Family Night, and Run and Tell That.

$10 In Advance.   $15 At the Door.

 

The Carlton Crush Harvest Festival

September 13, 2014

The festival features an array of activities for the whole family to enjoy, including:

The Grape Stomp Competition, Barrel Rolling Race, Wine Thief Relay Race, Kids’ Watermelon Eating Contest and Kids’ Grape Stomp, many Artists’ Market Merchants, live music and entertainment, traditional Midway games for children, Mark the Magician, helicopter rides, and superb Festival food from many local restaurants.

Free Admission. Free Parking available throughout the city.

The Crush Corral showcases fine local wines and craft beers. CBA Member businesses will be offering event specials for the day long event, especially Downtown Carlton’s many fine dining establishments.

Visit www.carltoncrush.com for more information.


When planning which end of summer events to attend in Yamhill Valley, OR, be sure to book a stay at Youngberg Hill Vineyard & Inn.  Atop the rolling hills just outside McMinnville, OR, Youngberg Hill Vineyard & Inn features four suites and four luxuriously appointed guest rooms. All rooms have private in-suite baths, comfortable chairs to relax in and enjoy the views. The spacious house is centrally heated and air-conditioned. For your enjoyment, on the first floor you will find a library, lounging salon and large dining room. The entire house is encircled by covered decks overlooking our vineyard and the valley to the Coast Range, Mount Jefferson, Mount Hood and the Willamette Valley, making it the perfect destination for your Oregon Wine Country getaway!

View Guest Rooms and Book Your Stay Here

How Does Grafting Wine Grapes Work?

July 1st, 2014 by Rachel

July Blog 1 - Pic 1Many wine grapes in the US are grafted on – meaning the root of the grape plant isn’t the exact same strain as the top of the plant.  This is often a way of strengthening delicate grape types by giving it a hardier or more pest resistant root system.

Grafting wine grapes can also be used by winemakers to replace existing grapes with a new type.  So, if a winery wanted to grow Chardonnay where they were growing Pinot Noir, they would only have to graft Chardonnay grapes onto the existing roots.  This means a winery can begin producing the new grapes much more swiftly than if they had dug up their previous grapes and planted a whole new grape plant.

Why do Many Wineries Graft?

The majority of wine grapes you hear about are grafted onto rootstock due to an American pest. Back before we had officials to check whether certain plants carried disease or bugs that the ecosystem of other countries can’t handle, American vines were important to England and Europe.

Unfortunately, these vines came with a little pest that attack grapes.  The wine grapes in these areas had no natural resistance to the pest – so wine production was almost halted in Europe for a time. After the pest was discovered, winemakers developed a work-around.  They grafted their grapes to American rootstock, which has a resistance to the pests.

The practice of grafting in order to improve a grape varieties’ chance of survival continues to this day.

How to Graft

The process of grafting is pretty simple, but requires a lot of skill and expertise. Basically:

1. The root onto which the plant will be grafted is planted and allowed to establish itself.

2. Any trunks growing from the root are cut down to the ground at a spot which is approximately the same size as the trunk of the plant to be grafted.

3. A cut is made both in the trunk and the plant which is to be grafted on.  The plant and trunk are notched together.

4. They are then tied together with a material to keep the graft in place.

5. Soil is used as an additional support and as a moist surface which will help the plant heal more swiftly.

In the end, you have the varietal you want to grow attached to a root which will give it the protection and nutrients it needs to produce fantastic wine.  We can all raise a glass to that!