Archive for the ‘Youngberg Hill Vineyard’ Category

What Wine Terms Really Mean

May 12th, 2015 by Rachel

Willamette Valley Wine TermsWinemaking is a highly specialized field. Because of this, there are a number of wine terms which can get pretty confusing because they often have both specialized meanings as well as non-specialized definitions. Many of these wine terms have roots in other languages, which can make them seem more confusing.

We want to help you articulate and understand what it is about wine that makes it something you love. We’ve created a list of terms that many people find confusing. Knowing these terms will help you discover even more wine that you love.

Acid: This chemical is produced during the fermentation process. Grapes from cooler regions or chilly seasons have higher acidity levels while grapes from warmer climates have lower acidity. In white wine, acidity can taste like lemon or lime juice. Acid adds tartness and zest to wine.

Body: This is a very commonly used term when one is trying to identify a type of wine. The term “body” is used to describe the weight or feel of the wine in your mouth. Often what determines body is the amount of alcohol in the wine. The higher the alcohol, the more body the wine has.

Earthy: When we say something is “earthy,” we often mean that it is evocative of the pleasant smell of rich, fresh, clean soil. It can also indicate that the wine has woody or truffle scents. In French, this term is called goût de terroir.

Finish: The term “finish” is used to describe the quality of a wine. Finish indicates the taste the wine leaves in one’s mouth after drinking. When it has a long, rich taste that lingers after your wine has been swallowed, it is said to have a “long finish.”Willamette Valley Wine Term

Mineral, Minerality: This is a wine tasting term that indicates the smell of wet stones or crushed rocks. It can also mean that a wine has a taste indicative of the land in which the grapes were grown. This means it can have different tastes – anything from chalk to slate. Often wines with minerality are complex and nuanced.

Oaky: We use oak barrels to age our wine. The type of oak barrel and the length of time the wine resides in the barrel affect the taste. Usually oak adds flavors of butter, vanilla or coconut to white wines. In red wine it often adds the taste of baking spices, toasty vanilla or sometimes dill. A wine can become overly oaked and the taste can overwhelm the wine making it taste charred or burnt, or like lumber or plywood.

Residual Sugar: This is the sugar that remains in the wine after fermentation. This may or may not be done on purpose. Sugar can be left in to help change the taste of your wine, making it less astringent or creating a sweeter wine. However, sometimes residual sugar can cause a less than pleasant taste, making a wine too sweet.

Tannin: The mouth-puckering substance that comes from grape skins, seeds, stems, or even oak barrels. Tannins help your wine age and develop. Younger wines have a stronger taste of tannin than wines that have been aged. This is often solved by decanting a bottle or aerating.

Terroir: A French term that indicates the entire physical and environmental characteristics of a particular vineyard. These characteristics influence the grapes and the wine that is made from them. We respect our terroir here at Youngberg Hill.

There are an enormous amount of terms associated with winemaking and wine tasting. These are just a few of them. You can always come to our Willamette Valley winery and ask us what we mean when we describe our wines. Associating specialized words with an actual taste will help you deepen your knowledge of wine and help you find even more wines that you love.

Cheers!

The Perfect Wine for Cinco De Mayo

April 28th, 2015 by Rachel

The Perfect Wine for Cinco De MayoCinco De Mayo is right around the corner!  What better way to celebrate this day of delicious food than with the perfect wine? Here are suggested pairings for five of our favorite Mexican meals.

Tortilla chips with salsa and guacamole – This is a classic starter at any Mexican table. The spice of the salsa paired with creamy guac and salty chips make this a perfect pairing for Pinot Gris, Riesling, or Sauvignon Blanc. Pinot Gris works the best if the salsa is a chunky Pico de Gallo.

Beef barbacoa tacos with lime and cilantro – Barbacoa spiced beef tacos have a very strong flavor all on its own. This pairs well with full-bodied reds like Malbec, Cabernet Sauvignon,  and Tempranillo.

Enchilada suizas – This cheesy, rich Mexican dish used to be incredibly popular, but is hard to find on menus these days. There is a lot of red sauce, heavy cream, and cheese involved in this dish, so it can be a little tricky to pair wine with it. The best wines for this dish are fruit-forward whites like Pinot Gris, unoaked Chardonnay, or Riesling. If you don’t want to drink white, you can also try a young Beaujolais with this dish.

Cheesy nachos with black beans and salsa – You don’t need creativity to make cheesy and delicious nachos and cheese into a meal. This can be a tough one to pair wine with though because of the spice of the salsa, starch of the beans, creaminess of cheese, and – let’s face it – greasiness of the deep-fried chips. We love sparkling wine for this scrumptious Mexican meal. Other options are Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris, Barbera, or Zinfandel.

Steak fajitas – Who doesn’t love fajitas? There are so many flavors to enjoy, from the zing of lemon and lime to the spice of onions and peppers to the creaminess of sour cream. This flavor-forward Tex-Mex favorite requires a juicy, high-alcohol wine like Primitivo.

Some Additional Cinco De Mayo Pairing Advice

Mexican food varies greatly when it comes to spice. If you are more likely to eat milder foods, the go-to wines for most Mexican food are Pinot Noir or Zinfandel. If you want to kick the spice up a notch, try a sweet wine like Riesling or Rosé.

No matter what wine you drink or food you enjoy on May 5th, we hope you have a happy Cinco De Mayo!

5 Tips for Destination Wedding Planning in Wine Country

April 14th, 2015 by Rachel

Willamette Valley BrideLet’s face it, destination weddings can be tough to plan. You aren’t at the location nor are you  interviewing people and discussing options in person. However, these barriers can be overcome. You can plan a really wonderful and gorgeous wedding out here in the Willamette Valley.

Tip #1

Come visit before you have paid out anything that is non-refundable. If you have never been to Oregon wine country or the Willamette Valley, it would be smart to pay us a visit before you give any wedding venue anything non-refundable. This will allow you to understand a few things:

  • How far the destination is from your hotel and the hotel in which your guests are staying.
  • What you will need when it comes to decoration and theme.
  • Which vendors might be your best options when it comes to cake, food, flowers, and more.
  • The logistics for transporting anything you are bringing from home.

Additionally, coming out for a visit will allow you and your significant other to feel assured in your choice of destination location.Destination Wedding Planning

Tip #2

Expand your view on hiring help. Because you are traveling to your wedding location, you have additional options when it comes to hiring professionals to help you. There are local options, which your destination location will likely recommend. There are also professionals like wedding planners and photographers who may be able to travel with you or travel to your location for you. It may even be a fun idea to hire a professional photographer to document not just your wedding, but your journey to the wedding location.

Tip #3

Coordinate with your wedding location. Long-distance wedding planning requires about the same amount of coordination in advance as a local wedding. However, this coordination is usually less hands-on than a wedding closer to home. To solve this problem, you can often get your destination wedding venue and long-distance vendors to complete the smaller tasks that make up a wedding.

For example, you should discuss setting up the wedding venue, your final guest numbers, seating plans, and placement of table cards with your wedding location. Additionally, get your florist, baker, photographer, caterer, DJ, and other vendors on the same page by giving them all the location and your planner’s information.

Tip #4Wine Country Wedding Ideas

Research local wedding law. That sounds daunting, but it really isn’t. All you need to know is what it will take for you to get a marriage license in the state in which you are being wed. You can likely find out with a quick Google search.

Tip #5

Plan in advance so your wedding is stress free. Get all the heavy lifting planned out beforehand. That way, on your big day, all you and your partner have to do is meet at the top of the aisle and say “I Do.”

Planning a destination wedding? Share your tips and experiences with us!

Why Should You Join a Wine Club?

April 7th, 2015 by Rachel

We love Willamette Valley Pinot Noir here at Youngberg HillThis Saturday is our wine pick up party for wine club members visiting us here in the Willamette Valley. Members who wish to pick up their wine can swing by anytime between 10 AM and 4 PM on April 11th to receive their spring shipment… and the traditional fresh batch of baklava.

The wine club here at Youngberg Hill is a close knit group. We think there are many reasons for this. Here are just a few:

1. Because we are both a vineyard and winery, we can offer more when it comes to wine club membership. For example, our standard club membership provides wine as well as savings on additional wine purchased.

However, membership also provides access to private events, library wines, limited releases and exclusive bottlings. Pinot Club membership not only gives the member additional bottles of wine, but provides them with complimentary attendance for two at a select winemaker dinner as well as a vineyard/winery tour for four.

2. We both grow and create the wine right here at Youngberg Hill – and we have a large number of events and dinners every year. This means our members get exclusive access to activities whenever they are visiting the Willamette Valley.

3. Exclusivity allows our members to meet each other and become friends with all of us here at Youngberg Hill. So, our wine club members not only receive the wine they love all year round, they have access to the winemakers, special events, and limited-batch wine. All of this creates a close-knit group of wine lovers.Willamette Valley's Youngberg Hill wine club

This is what we feel a wine club should be. There are larger, more corporate-type wine clubs out there. These provide members with wine every few months along with a newsletter or discounts. This hands-off approach may work for some, but for those who care about the terroir and want to delve into the winemaking process, the corporate approach leaves them out in the cold.

We take the personal approach to all activities here at Youngberg Hill. From growing the grapes to hosting winemaker dinners. From music on the deck in summertime to the annual grapevine wreath making party in the winter. Each activity allows us to deepen our connection with our community, the land around us, and the wine we create.

What is your opinion of wine clubs? We would love to hear from you!

How to Make the Perfect Wine Pairing

March 17th, 2015 by Rachel

Wine PairingThere are probably a million “perfect pairing” charts and articles discussing the ins and outs of wine pairing on the internet. We also post articles once in a while discussing what wines would pair well with certain foods. With the ultimate wine pairing event – a winemaker dinner – coming up, we thought we’d take a look at how to pair wine with food once again.

Yum and Yuck

Before you even start pairing wines with food, you have to think about the “yum” and “yuck” factor. That is, if you don’t like the wine or the food, no amount of pairing will make it delicious. So, pick both wine and food that you enjoy.

Rules, who needs them?

There are exceptions to every rule. For example, you don’t always have to pair red wine with red meat. Pinot Noir goes great with rich fishes and roasted veggies, as well as some white meats.

Compare and contrast

Think about the similar flavors in food. Would you pair this food with a zingy lemon sauce? Then a wine with lemon notes would likely treat it well. Is this food better with butter? A rich, buttery white might do the trick. Are there earth notes in the food? An earthy red may be just what you need.

Go local

If you are eating local foods, it’s likely a local wine will pair well. We often drink local wines with our meals because we are eating food from Willamette Valley farms. Another tactic is to look at where the food you are eating is from and go for a wine in a similar region. If you are eating a traditional Bordeaux-style meal like confit de canard, you can go with a Willamette Valley Pinot as we have a similar region to Bordeaux.

Acid, fat, salt, and sweet

When stripped down to the barest essentials, food and wine are all about flavors. An acidic wine will pair well with fatty and sweet food. Wine with high tannin levels will go well with sweet food while wine with a high alcohol content will cut through fatty food. Salty foods should get a low acid wine while sweet foods will want a little acidity.

In the end, wine pairing takes some practice. However, always go for foods and wines that you love. Be adventurous and tell us where your culinary adventures take you!

What will you Learn at the Winemaker Dinner?

March 3rd, 2015 by Rachel

Youngberg Hill Willamette ValleyWe have a series of winemaker dinners planned here at our Willamette Valley vineyard and elsewhere in the Willamette Valley this year. At the moment, we have dinners scheduled for: March 20th, April 17th, May 2nd, and May 30th. Stay tuned to our calendar for any changes in dates or additional winemaker dinners and local events.

We love hosting winemaker dinners for many reasons. There is great conversation, wonderful people, delicious food, and fantastic wine. We also get to share our passion and insight when it comes to winemaking. Our guests love our dinners too, and here’s why:

Learning about wine

We are able to talk to our guests about the wine we create as well as the land and the region in which it is made. In our case, we both grow and create wine at our location in the Willamette Valley. This is a small enough event that we can discuss ins and outs as well as answer any and all questions without having to “work the room.”

If you have specific questions about wine, winemaking, or our region of the world, this is the time and place to ask them.

Tasting uncommon wine

You won’t find our Port anywhere in the “our wines” section of our website, but we are serving it at our March 20th winemaker dinner. You also get a chance to see what we as winemakers drink. It’s not all Pinot, all the time. We’re having a wonderful Champagne at the March 20th event too.

Understanding the “whys” behind pairingWillamette Valley Vineyard Winemaker Dinner

Sometimes a pairing can sound odd, but taste amazing. Here’s your chance to know why we chose a specific wine to pair with a specific recipe – or vice versa.

Eat, drink, and be merry

More than anything, winemaker dinners are there for us to make new friends, have wonderful discussions, eat amazing food, and sip on some glorious wine. We love the family and group aspect of these dinners, we love answering questions, but more than anything, we enjoy connecting with old friends and making new ones.

What question would you ask a winemaker? Comment below and we’ll answer!

How Wine Bottling Works

January 27th, 2015 by Rachel

Wine bottling at Youngberg HillPatience is the keyword in making wine. One has to let it sit in barrels and go through the fermentation process until it is clarified enough for bottling. Even when the wine has clarified to a point where wine bottling is the next step, the process cannot occur for a few days. One must first rack the wine, let it settle for a again, and then go into the bottling process.

Youngberg Hill is a relatively small winery. This means that our winemaking process is tightly controlled and monitored. The precise moment the wine is ready for bottling can be pinpointed and bottling can start very rapidly.

The concept of bottling seems pretty simple. You are putting the wine into a bottle for further aging or for sale. Because wine reacts chemically with air, this process is a little more complicated than filling a bottle with water or some other liquid. We try to allow very little air into the bottle while it is being filled. However, a minute amount of air is needed so that the bottle can handle temperature changes and so that the wine aging process can continue to occur.

After wine bottles are filled, they should be corked or capped promptly. When wine bottles are freshly filled they need to remain standing for a few days to allow any inside pressures to equalize. After a few days though, wine bottles should be stored on their sides in a cool cellar.

Wine doesn’t stop aging once it is out of the barrel. Some wines benefit from bottle aging. Others are drinkable right away. You can often find recommendations about drinkability in the tasting notes of a particular wine. You can find out tasting notes here.

Do you want to find out more about the winemaking process? Contact us or visit us!

Five Steps for your Winter Wine Country Escape

January 13th, 2015 by Rachel

Winter escapeThe holidays are over and winter has officially set in. This doesn’t mean you are snowed in to your home and stuck for the season. In fact, now is the best time of year to get away. You no longer have to cover for co-workers or head to family gatherings. The hectic holidays are out of the way – so it’s time to enjoy a real holiday.

Here are your five steps to escaping this winter:

#1. Recruit a partner in crime.

This may be a co-worker, a boss or a family member. No matter who it is, your partner in crime is the person who will help you pull off your winter escape. Your boss or co-worker may be able to help you out by taking over a couple of work projects to get you the time off you need. Your family member may be able to take the kids while you’re out of town.

Just be sure your partner in crime will be rewarded when you get back. Maybe you can cover foOregon Wine Country in Winterr your boss or coworker in future – or perhaps you can babysit for your family member’s kids when they head out on their own holiday.

#2. Plan to go away from home.

The post holiday season is no time for a staycation. You need to get out of the house and get pampered. We can recommend the Winter Wine Tasting Package here at Youngberg Hill for some seriously delicious pampering. Oregon wine country is a great place to get away and relax.

#3. Pack up your holiday decorations.

You don’t want to come back to more holiday work. Get everything packed away and your home cleaned up before you head out. That way, when you come back relaxed and reinvigorated you can really feel as if you are launching into a new year.

#4. Make your wine country travel plans.

Since you are headed out of town, set up your travel plans. If you are driving out, is there a delicious lunch location like Bistro Maison on the way to your destination? Be sure to make the trip itself leisurely and relaxing. If you are headed out to Youngberg Hill, we can give you recommendations to make your trip out enjoyable.

#5. Go!

The time has come. You have work and the kids all sorted out. You’ve got a delicious place to stop on the way and you have a destination. Go ahead and take some well deserved time off!

Winter is a gorgeous time to visit our Willamette Valley vineyard & Inn. Let us know how we can help you get out here for some winter R&R.

Looking Back at 2014

January 6th, 2015 by Rachel

2014 harvestWe had a fantastic year last year. As we look forward to 2015, we wanted to take a moment to recognize all of the wonderful friends, clients, and family who made 2014 such a great year.

Harvest

Not only did we have a really great harvest in 2014, we were able to taste the fruits of our 2013 harvest. Additionally, we planted up a new block which is dedicated to the production of Chardonnay grapes. This means we have a very exciting wine production future ahead of us!

2014 Recognition

We received some really wonderful recognition this year from:

  • Oregon Bride Magazine: Best All-Inclusive Venue in the Valley
  • Seattle Times listed our 2012 Cuvee Pinot Noir among the Top 50 wines for 2014
  • 2014 Oregon Wine Awards gave us Gold for our 2010 Cuvee and the 2010 Barrel Select
  • 2014 Sunset International Wine Competition awarded our 2010 Pinot Noir
  • BedandBreakfast.com listed us amoung the Top 10 Vineyard Inns
  • Great ratings on our 2012 Cuvee, 2012 Jordan Pinot Noir, 2012 Natasha Pinot Noir, and 2011 Cuvee Pinot Noir from The PinotFile

2014 Seattle Times Top 50 2014 Oregon Bride

Community Events

We had some great events at the winery and in the local Willamette Valley and Yamhill Valley communities. These types of get togethers allow us to stay in touch with the local area and provide a fun venue for us to meet new friends and reconnect with old friends. Here is just a quick snippet of a few events:

Last year we hosted several winemaker dinners which allowed us to connect with our wine club members as well as make new friends who wanted to learn about wine. Looking forward, we have a number of winemaker dinners already on the calendar – so if you enjoy delicious food paired with fantastic wine and wonderful conversation, be sure to come to one of our dinners!

Throughout the year we hosted a number of passport events here in Oregon wine country. We will stay involved in the McMinnville AVA and other passport events throughout 2015. We are also going to be a part of the 29th Annual International Pinot Noir Celebration in July of this year – so keep an eye on our calendar or subscribe to our newsletter to stay updated on wine country events throughout the year.

In May of 2014 we participated in the Oregon Wines Fly Free program. This wasn’t just a local event – it worked with Alaska Airlines to promote local wineries, specifically in Oregon wine country.

We had the opportunity to host the Linfield Orchestra Benefit last year. We will be hosting again this year. Be sure to check out the calendar for details.

The many opportunities we have had to connect with friends old and new and to work with other Willamette valley vineyards really made our year.

Thank YousThank you!

We wanted to take a moment to thank all those who reviewed and voted for our wines and our Inn. We would be nothing without our wonderful customers. Here are just a few of the fantastic reviews we received just in 2014:

Great Northwest Destinations called us “One of the most beautiful, serene, and relaxing places in the Pacific Northwest” while stating that our wine is “seriously delicious.”

Sips with Friends said that our 2010 Barrel Select was “a stunner.”

American Winery Guide said “Why would you want to go anywhere else?” They also said of our wines “The wines reflect the terroir because of Wayne’s farming philosophies.”2014 Wedding

One Weddingwire.com reviewer said about her wedding at Youngberg Hill: “Youngberg is the most wonderful place for a wedding. We were so happy with our choice of venue, we would not do anything different.”

Another reviewer on Tripadvisor.com said “The owners and staff make you feel more like family than temporary visiters. We are already return customers and will continue to be so in the future!”

These are just a few of the many, many wonderful reviews we received in 2014. We closed with that last one because it’s so true. We consider every one of you family.

To read even more reviews and articles, click here.

So, let us know what we can do to help you stay, plan an event, or enjoy wine from Youngberg Hill this year. We are excited to see you!

Greeting the New Year

December 23rd, 2014 by Rachel

Happy New YearIt’s traditional at the close of the year to think about the new year. We had a truly fantastic 2014. We were honored to host a number of weddings and many great guests. We received some wonderful awards and a number of excellent reviews. Our wines were featured in newspapers and magazines around the U.S. The 2014 harvest was extremely promising and we are looking forward to the wines produced from it with excitement.

As we look toward 2015, one word comes up over and over again. That is: passion. We work to constantly live our passion. What does that mean for us?

It means means creating an environment for our guests Wine from Youngberg Hillwhere they feel comfortable, at home, among friends, welcome, and relaxed. It means growing grapevines and producing fantastic grapes in a holistic way. It means improving the environment we surround ourselves with. It means creating wines which allow you to taste the care given to the land.

We are lucky enough to live our passion each and every day here at Youngberg Hill. It is a thrill for us to share this passion with you – into 2015 and beyond.

Tell us below what your passion is – and how you intend to fulfill it this bright new year. Cheers to you!