Farm-to-Fork Foods Paired with Harvest-to-Glass Wines

November 11th, 2014 by Rachel

Youngberg Hill Wine HarvestIt is often said what grows together, goes together.  This idea is at the heart of Oregon’s farm-to-fork movement.  The wine grown and harvested here in the Willamette Valley is perfect with fresh seasonal ingredients brought from farm to table. This time of year you will find Oregon wine country filled with seasonal foods like beets, cabbages, parsnips, carrots, celery root, chard, late-season corn and mushrooms, and winter squash.

As with the wine produced throughout the Willamette Valley, the good food found here is a direct result of the quality of each ingredient.  In Oregon, chefs and farmers work together, resulting in the modern day foodie paradise of Willamette Valley.  Choose to stay with us at Youngberg Hill Vineyards, and this rich abundance of farm fresh foods and handcrafted wines will be at your fingertips.

For a truly unique Oregon experience, dine at Thistle. There the chefs create seasonal menus based on what is available to them throughout their Willamette Valley network of farms. The chefs and owners of Thistle work closely with local farmers in an effort to develop sustainable agriculture and have been one of the innovative forces behind McMinnville’s farm to table movement. When you’re ready for something sweet, pick up some locally made chocolates at Honest Chocolates, located in downtown McMinnville.

You can also visit us at the Granary District Winery – along with a number of other local wineries – for a pre-Thanksgiving open house. You will have the opportunity to taste our 2012 Pinots as well as sample other wines made in the Willamette and Yamhill Valleys. This open house event will take place on November 22nd and 23rd from 11:00am through 4:00pm.

Oregonians produce all of this delicious food and wine in a sustainable and environmentally friendly way.  Oregonians have a long legacy of preserving the state’s pristine ecology, first establishing their commitment to sustainable farming practices more than 100 years ago with the State’s first environmental law.  At Youngberg Hill Vineyards, we value the beautiful land we live and work on, and are proud of our green approach to wine country living.

What is most import to you about the environment in which your food and wine was grown?  Let us know in the comments below.

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What Makes Some Wine Have Higher Alcohol Content Than Others?

November 4th, 2014 by Rachel

Wine grapesYou may have noticed that wine alcohol levels have slowly inched up over the years. While it was hard to find a wine that naturally reached 14% alcohol by volume 35 years ago, it’s pretty common now. This high alcohol content has been attributed to the changing palate of the modern drinker as well as to climate change.

The modern wine connoisseur (that’s you!) tends to want softer tannins and lower acidity. Translation: we want something immediately drinkable. While many people buy a bottle, take it home and drink it, very few have wine cellars where they can let the tannins in their delicious beverages mellow and age to perfection.

This means winemakers like Wayne can allow the grapes a little more hang time to collect some extra sunlight and sugar before harvest. Another advantage to allowing grapes to ripen more fully before the wine is created is there is a lower acidity to the wine. The intention of the harvest is to hit the sweet spot where the perfect amount of sugar intersects with the right amount of acid. In Oregon wine country, we also have to consider weather conditions. While we have had a bit of an Indian summer this year, there have been early cold spells in previous years, where the grapes had to be harvested just before the weather turned.

The ripeness of grapes when harvested, as well as any overripe grapes that sneak into a harvest can affect the overall alcohol content of the wine. As we have stated in previous articles, we hand harvest to ensure only the best grapes are used to create your wine. This means you don’t get grapes in your Youngberg Hill wine that we didn’t intend to use.

Once the fruit is harvested, the fermentation process eats up all those sugars and creates alcohol. Pinot Noir is naturally in the higher alcohol range – around 12-14% alcohol by volume on average. You can expect a much higher alcohol by volume in dessert wines like sherry or port.

Do you like the lower acidity and higher alcohol volume trend in wine? Let us know by commenting below.

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How to Read a Wine Barrel

October 28th, 2014 by Rachel

Youngberg Hill Wine Barrel Reading a wine barrel sounds like a relatively simple process. You are looking at a label imprinted into the wood, right? There’s a little more to it than that. On the left you will see one of our new barrels for our estate Pinot Noir. On the top of the barrel is information about it. Some barrel manufacturers (called “cooperages” in the wine world) put more information on their barrels than others.

On this barrel we have:

  • Cadus is the name of the cooperage.
  • France is the source of the barrel.
  • Origine means the point of origin.
  • YH are the initials of Youngberg Hill. This barrel was made specially for us.
  • Troncais is the oak forest in France that the wood is from. There are six different forests this oak type comes from and each forest has specific characteristics.
  • French oak – 30 months air dried means the amount of time after harvesting the tree during which the wood is dried out in the open. After the wood is dried, the barrel is created.
  • M+ signifies that the inside of the barrel has been toasted a certain amount. In this case it was toasted to medium plus. The amount a barrel has been toasted contributes to the taste of your wine.
  • Slow extraction means that this barrel is best used when the wine will be in it for more than a year because the wood slowly interacts with the wine.

At Youngberg Hill we are very specific about our choice in barrels. We use white oak as it has been the standard in the winemaking industry for centuries. It brings out unique qualities in wine and allows wine to interact with it and through it. Youngberg Hill Pinot NoirOther wood has been experimented with, but winemakers around the world have come back to white oak.

The white oak we use for barrels is from France. French white oak barrels have been the barrel of choice for Pinot Noir producers the world over. The qualities we look for are:

  • The age of the oak trees.
  • The weather in which they are grown (cool so the growth is slower and the grain is more open.)
  • The drying conditions of the wood in an open air environment.
  • The manufacturing process of the barrel.

All of these qualities allow Pinot Noir to age beautifully. Every one of these qualities are found in French white oak barrels.

Big red wines like Cabernet, Borolo, Malbec and all those big reds in between can use a wider variation of oak barrels. They are thick skinned, big boned, heavy wines that can compete with other oaks more easily without losing the character of the wine. Pinot Noir is a delicate grape with thinner skins that can be easily overwhelmed by other oak options. French white oak has been found over the centuries to be subtle enough to interact with Pinot Noir.

What else would you like to learn about the Pinot-making process?  Let us know below.

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Wine Pairing with Classic Halloween Candies

October 21st, 2014 by Rachel

Wine pairing for Halloween candyIt’s almost Halloween!  It’s time to break out the candy corn, gummy worms, mini Kit Kats and all the other treats we love.  While we try to convince ourselves that only kids enjoy candy on Halloween, we can’t really get away from the fact that adults indulge too.  So, don’t fight it.  Just make it an adult dining experience by pairing your treats with wine.  That way, it’s not even an indulgence.  It’s a culinary adventure!

Here are some classic Halloween candies, with wine pairing recommendations:

  • Candy Corn is one of those Halloween treats that incites extreme reaction.  You either love candy corn, or you despise it.  There is no middle ground.  This (fortunately) is not the case with wine pairing. There are a few whites that would go well with this traditional treat.  Try a big, buttery Chardonnay, Viognier, Riesling or Gewürztraminer while gobbling these goodies.
  • Gummy Worms make your palates pucker in a delicious way. You can try Pinot Noir or Malbec with these sugar-encrusted treats.
  • Skittles and Starburst both pair well with the bubbles and freshness of Moscato or Prosecco.
  • Caramel Apple for those who want to feel as if they are being healthy, while still indulging in a delicious treat, the caramel apple is the way to go. There are also several wines which pair well with this treat-on-a-stick.  These include: Muscat, Gewürztraminer, Sauvignon Blanc, Sauternes, or Pinot Gris.
  • Red Licorice or Red Vines pair perfectly with Pinot Noir.
  • Reeses Peanut Butter Cups or Peanut M&M’s go well with Port or Sherry.
  • Hershey’s Chocolate Bars, Kit Kats, and Milky Way Bars in those classic, individual sizes or in the lustworthy, family size can be paired with a jammy Zinfandel or Pinot Noir – or with a Merlot.

Feel like snacking on something a little more healthy?  Never fear!  You can still pair your roasted pumpkin seeds with Pinot Gris or Sauvignon Vert

Here’s to you and your Halloween wine pairing adventure!  Let us know in the comments below if you find any other fun wine and candy pairings.

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Why Fall is the “On Season” for Oregon Wine Country

October 14th, 2014 by Rachel

Fall Oregon Wine Country - at Youngberg Hill Inn and Winery The end of the summer season is often when many vacation destinations close their doors. Not here in the Willamette Valley.  This is actually one of our busiest times of year.  Why is that?  Two words: Harvest Season.

Many wineries all around the Yamhill and Willamette Valleys are still filled with golden or purple grapes, getting a little more hang time or being enthusiastically harvested.

The grapes aren’t the only thing changing color. The leaves on the vines are turning too.  You haven’t seen Oregon wine country until you have seen row after row of gorgeous, fall color lighting up the vines. Our valley is a photographer’s dream. This is one of the reasons the Willamette Valley was listed in the top ten places to go leaf peeping in America.

The amazing fall foliage, the activity and excitement of harvesting grapes, and all that delicious wine make autumn the right time to visit wine country.  It’s truly gorgeous.Wildlife at Youngberg Hill

Additionally, because Youngberg Hill is a holistic vineyard which works with nature, this is a great time of year to see anything from elk to any number of birds.  Many animals can be seen on our grounds as well as at nearby locations like Cascadia State Park, Dexter State Recreation Site, and Jasper State Park.

Finally, for the those who want a break from the outdoors, Youngberg Hill is located by several cities with great shopping (local art, handmade chocolates, or artisan soaps, anyone?), delicious food, and – of course – plenty of wine.  There are also several microbrews available for those who want to add some variety to their palate.

Harvest season is the most exciting time of year to be on a vineyard in Oregon Wine Country. When’s your favorite time to visit?

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Four Great Questions to Ask at a Winemaker Dinner

October 7th, 2014 by Rachel

Winemaker DinnerA winemaker dinner is a laid back, unpretentious food and wine pairing event which allows people to enjoy great food and wine along with excellent conversation.  It’s also a good time to pick a winemaker’s brain.  However, even at events designed for some question and answer, it can be hard to figure out what to ask. With our upcoming harvest winemaker dinner on October 25th, we thought we could give you some ideas for great questions you may want to ask the winemaker.

#1. Where in the world do your favorite wines originate?
The winemaker clearly chose his or her vineyard because of the ability of the terroir to grow specific grapes. However, the varietals grown come from a different location, like France or Italy.  The winemaker dinner is a great time to dig deep and learn more about the history of your wine.

#2. Can you explain why this wine pairs well with the food I’m eating?
Sometimes you’ll get a pairing that don’t make sense in your head – but is just right in your mouth. The winemaker and chef have gone over the food, down to the sauces, that pair just right with the wine served. Ask the winemaker why the pairings were made – you might be surprised to find that, without that particular sauce, your duck and Pinot Noir wouldn’t match well at all.

#3. What characteristics do you think we can expect in wine coming from the most recent/upcoming harvest?
It’s wine harvesting season!  This is the perfect time to pick the winemaker’s brain about what he expects to come out of this year’s bounty.

#4. What is the story of this particular wine?
The winemaker has the real in-depth knowledge behind that vintage and varietal of wine. Get the scoop.  Ask about the process of deciding your wine was ready for bottling and what the weather was like for that particular year. You’ll learn more about wine – and will likely hear a few fun stories along with way.

In the end, a winemaker dinner is time to sit back, relax, and enjoy. You can learn more about the wine you are drinking than you’d be able to at a restaurant – and catch up with friends. No matter why you attend, we hope to see you at the dinner this month!  Will you be able to come?  Click here to get the details.

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Why Pinot is the Traditional Grape for Our Valley

September 23rd, 2014 by Rachel

Sept Blog 4 - Pic 1 The Yamhill and Willamette valleys have become the heart of Pinot Noir in Oregon. Here at Youngberg Hill is no exception.  We have recently grafted some Chardonnay grapes, but that is a new development.  Our main wine has been Pinot, which is the traditional grape for our valley, since we bought Youngberg Hill in 2003.

 

There are some very good reasons why Oregon winegrowers have concentrated so heavily upon the Pinot grape. Here are a few:

 

1. Pinot Noir is a very finicky grape that loves the temperate weather and fresh ocean breezes provided by our valley.

2. Oregon wine country is a lot like Pinot Noir’s native Burgundy. This means the grape does great in the area. To give you some perspective, in California wine country, Pinot Noir is only 8% of the state’s wine grapes.  Here in Oregon, Pinot Noir is 55% of the our state’s wine grapes.

3. Pinot pairs with many local foods like chanterelle mushrooms  as well as many foods in general, so it makes our inner foodie jump for joy. Sept Blog 4 - Pic 2Oregon is all about its food, wine, and beer.  We experiment and Pinot matches along with many, many of those experiments. And, if our food experiments fail – we still have it to drink as consolation.

4. Finally, as we all know – Pinot is delicious. We love how our Pinot showcases the terroir and has distinctive tastes, depending on where we planted. With our Burgundy-like land, we can pull off amazing Pinot Noir that is unlike any other created on earth. It is distinct to our land. This is something of which we are fiercely proud.

Oregon winemakers are, by nature, risk takers. We love picking the finickiest of wines, planting it in one of the most beautiful valleys on earth, and producing fabulous wine.

 

What is your favorite food to pair with Pinot Noir? Let us know!

 

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What is the Best Harvesting Method?

September 16th, 2014 by Rachel

Sept Blog 3 - Pic 1When it comes to our land, we always go for the most organic, sustainable and holistic  method here at Youngberg Hill.  This is because we believe the method that works for Mother Nature is the method that will work best for our wine.  Our wine philosophy extends to using the best harvesting method for our grapes.

 

That said, there are two basic ways to harvest grapes.  One is by hand and one is by machine.  Of course, a winery may choose to include some machines into processes before or after the harvest – like a destemmer or a tractor.  But the harvest itself can be done either by hand or by machine.  We will consider these two methods:

Mechanical Harvesting

One of the greatest advantages of mechanical harvesting – and why many large winemakers choose this type of harvesting – is speed.  Just as is the case in making manufacturing pretty much anything, when you add machines, things go faster.  This means a large, corporate winemaker might be tempted by mechanical harvesting to save money.

Another reason why speed is important to these large grape growers is  they don’t want their grapes to become overripe.  This can create bad wine that needs a lot of extra additives to make it palatable.

Hand Harvesting  

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Harvesting grapes by hand has a major advantage over mechanical harvesting.  That is: quality of fruit.

Hand harvested grapes are more precisely what we want in our wine.  This is because the person harvesting the grapes can consider what  they are harvesting as they go.  There is another process later, during winemaking, during which people are able to go through the harvest again and pick out any unwanted grapes, stems, leaves, etc.  But the hand harvest is the first line of defense against bad bunches.

This extra sorting power may not seem like it makes a big difference in the quality of wine produced, but it actually does.  Not only are there more eyes on the grapes that do go in  to your wine, many substandard grapes (unripe grapes or raisins) can be removed before they get to the crusher.  When you consider that it takes about 30  vines of grapes to make one barrel of wine – you see where the difference comes in.   Say there were 5 raisins and 10 unripe grapes, plus one leaf per cluster.  That’s about 200 raisins and 400 unripe grapes – plus 40 leaves that hand harvesting removed from that barrel of wine.

Another reason behind our hand harvesting preference is that Pinot Noir is a delicate fruit.  The process of machine harvesting punctures the fruit slightly, so in order to maintain a full cluster of intact grapes, we have to hand harvest.

Hand harvesting is one of the many ways we stay true to our grapes and the land which produced them.  Come taste the difference!

 

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Fall Foods and Perfect Pairings

September 9th, 2014 by Rachel

When Autumn arrives, we often turn our thoughts to comfort and warmth. With the harvest season, we also turn our thoughts to sumptuous meals and comfort food. Here are recipes with Fall foods and perfect pairings that promise to delight:

Oregon’s wine country is world renowned for Pinot Noir, a light to medium-bodied, food friendly red wine with red berry and cherry flavors. Come to our tasting room at Youngberg Hill Inn and try ours!

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What pairs perfectly with Pinot Noir? Local Golden Chanterelles. When prepared, Chanterelles have a delicious, buttery chicken flavor with fruit notes of apricot and a mild peppery taste. How about a smooth, golden, pureed Wild Mushroom Soup?

Try this recipe here.

 

Or try a few of of these recipes for a celebrated meal that your family and friends will love.

At Youngberg Hill we make a very fine Pinot Gris. With ours, you’ll find bright fruit aromatics range from grapefruit, mango, to apricot, leading to a flavor palate of lemon, grapefruit, apricot and tropical fruit. Its texture gives way to a wonderfully smooth and round finish that is easy to drink sitting out on the front deck. With a little higher acidity, it is very crisp with a soft, clean finish.

For the perfect complement, try this delectable dish. It is sure to be a crowd pleaser. You can also try these great recipes. They are positively divine.

Sept Blog 2 Pic 2

 

Lasagna with Fall Vegetables, Gruyere and Sage Bechamel 

Fall vegetables such as spinach, onions, and sweet potatoes combined with portobello mushrooms, herbs, parmesan, French gruyere, and exquisite sage bechamel for a savory and aromatic treat for the senses.

You can add or substitute parsnip, butternut squash, and pumpkin.

Now that’s what I call a perfect pairing!

 

Rare Pinot Blanc features fruit notes of apples and pears. Ours is wildly popular and often sells out. Pinot Blanc pairs well with chicken, lemon, custards, and white, soft cheeses such as brie and French gruyere.

Pinot Blanc’s light fruit compliments this Autumn Quiche perfectly. Sept Blog 2 Pic 3

The recipe makes use of a few fall harvest staples that are abundantly available: butternut squash, kale, thyme, and onion. You could also add zucchini, acorn squash and white mini pumpkin as well.

This recipe calls for a smoked gouda cheese. Yum!

As you can see, there are many great fall recipes that compliment our wines winningly.

We’ve shared just a few of our favorites with you, and we are positive you will enjoy our wines with them. Come visit our tasting room today and bring a bottle home with you.

Sept Blog 2 Pic 4

 

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Eight Reasons to Visit Yamhill Valley in the Fall

September 2nd, 2014 by Rachel

Sept Blog 1- Pic 1Ahhh, Fall Splendor…When a rich tapestry of spectacular color covers the beautiful Yamhill Valley it creates an unforgettably charming backdrop for your autumnal getaway.

You will feel there is something special about the crisp, clean air in Yamhill Valley.  Leaves rustle in the trees. A glorious spectacle of red, orange, purple and gold create a brilliant contrast to the uncommonly bright blue September through October sky. Leaves swirl on the roadside as you drive through the country. Sunsets are riveting, and the sunrise is even more radiant.

 If That Wasn’t Enough of a Reason to Visit the Yamhill Valley, Here Are 8 More Reasons That Will Delight You:

  • Wine. The fall grape harvest produces some of the best Pinots around. Curl up in a blanket on the hillside, take in our sweeping views of the valley’s rolling hills and stunning vineyards and share a bottle of wine from Youngberg Hill. Want to sample more great Yamhill Valley wines? Join up with an “Escape Artist” from The Grape Escape for an enjoyable tour.  They have been providing personalized private tours of the Oregon wine country for over 16 years. They’ll  share tips on the best ways to taste Oregon Pinots, then match them to local cuisine at the wineries along the way- Appetizers on their Afternoon Tour, lunch on their Full Day Escape, and dinners paired to wines on their Evening Escapes. Delish!
  • Food. Harvest season in Yamhill Valley provides unique dining experiences at fine local restaurants, particularly the ones that feature fresh, farm-to-fork fare.  In the fall, you must try The Joel Palmer House in nearby Dayton, OR.. Their unique specialty is fine dining and wine with recipes that focus around wild mushrooms, harvested from the local forests the same day. Others with truly fresh, locally grown food that will delight you are The Dundee Bistro, Red Hills Provincial Dining (Dundee, OR)  Bistro Maison in McMinnville, OR, and Cuvee in Carlton, OR.
  • Photographer’s Delight.  Bring your camera and travel to one of these locations and check out our beautiful native avian wildlife, amongst all the beautiful fall foliage. Travel through the countryside and snap pictures of old farmsteads, historic chapels, hillsides, river bends, and vineyards as they burnish golden in the fall… You are sure to capture some great images.
  • McMinnville, Oregon. McMinnville’s 3rd Street, nominated as one of the best main streets in the country, features charming sidewalks and historic buildings and is an eclectic mix of edgy, forward thinking green philosophy, art, music and international fare. Strolling down the tree lined sidewalks, you will find traditional French, Creole, Japanese, South American, Mexican, Spanish, Italian, Thai, and Northwest Cuisine. There are a number of coffee shops, each one, unique, wineries,and some art galleries, a gift shop, a brewery, a bike shop, yoga studios, ballet studios, two theatres, and many more local treasures to discover.
  • Carlton, OR. Carlton, Oregon is emerging from a sleepy rural town into an up and coming city. While it largely pays respect to its rural roots, it has smartly given a nod to chic urban renewal. As a matter of fact, with the addition of wineries and fine dining restaurants, it is fast becoming a notable destination in Yamhill Valley. The Horseradish is a local hotspot.
  • Golf. Cross Creek Golf Course, winner of the Player’s Choice Awards is located in Dallas, Oregon. It is a beautiful, challenging 18 hole course that is quickly becoming one of the most popular golf courses in the valley. Chehalem Glenn Golf Course in Newberg, Oregon boasts the best  practice facilities of any public course in Oregon.
  • The Coast. You aren’t far from the Oregon Coast, and the drive is breathtaking, as you wind through forests all the way to the beach. A trip down the highway 18 alongside a beautiful river lined with brilliant gold, red, and orange maples and yellow birch, against an emerald evergreen forest creates a stunningly beautiful journey and a lasting memory. 

 

When planning your fall trip to Yamhill Valley, look for openings at the Youngberg Hill Inn.

 

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