Posts Tagged ‘Oregon Pinot noir’

Youngberg Hill Vineyard and Inn

July 29th, 2014 by Rachel

July Vineyard and Inn Blog- Pic 1

 

Founded in 1989, Youngberg Hill Vineyard and Inn has become a staple of the Yamhill Valley and McMinnville Winegrowers Association. We focus on premium Oregon Pinot Noirs and excellent service for all our guests.

 

The Vineyard

The vineyards at Youngberg Hill lie in the coastal foothills of Yamhill Valley, just 25 miles away from the coast. The unique location has given us rich and diverse soil to grow amazing Pinot grapes for the past 25 years. Our first two Pinot Noir blocks in the vineyard were planted in 1989, followed by our one block of Pinot Gris in 2006 and our third Pinot Noir crop in 2008.

We are on a mission to practice organic and sustainable farming at Youngberg Hill. In 2010 we were certified “Sustainable” by the Oregon Wine Board, after gaining certifications from other third party organizations. In an effort to leave the earth healthier than how we found it, we only employ soft pesticides, such as biodegradable soaps and oils, on our vines. The caution and care shown to the plants is evident in the quality of Youngberg Hill wines.

Youngberg Hill, McMinnville, Willamette Valley, OregonThe Inn

With views from the deck overlooking the Coast Range, Mount Jefferson, Mount Hood, and of course the vineyards, the Youngberg Hill Inn offers a chance for a breathtaking getaway. Whether you stay in one of the five king suites or three queen guestrooms, you’re guaranteed to feel comfortable and pampered. In the mornings you can treat yourself to a gourmet breakfast or relax in the first floor library or salon. In the evening there are complimentary wine tastings where you can enjoy a famous Oregon Pinot Noir out on our deck.

Whether you come for a tasting or an overnight stay, Youngberg Hill’s goal is to provide high-quality service for a relaxing and satisfying visit.

Have you stayed with us before? Let us know about your experience in the comments!

Book your stay today!

How Does Grafting Wine Grapes Work?

July 1st, 2014 by Rachel

July Blog 1 - Pic 1Many wine grapes in the US are grafted on – meaning the root of the grape plant isn’t the exact same strain as the top of the plant.  This is often a way of strengthening delicate grape types by giving it a hardier or more pest resistant root system.

Grafting wine grapes can also be used by winemakers to replace existing grapes with a new type.  So, if a winery wanted to grow Chardonnay where they were growing Pinot Noir, they would only have to graft Chardonnay grapes onto the existing roots.  This means a winery can begin producing the new grapes much more swiftly than if they had dug up their previous grapes and planted a whole new grape plant.

Why do Many Wineries Graft?

The majority of wine grapes you hear about are grafted onto rootstock due to an American pest. Back before we had officials to check whether certain plants carried disease or bugs that the ecosystem of other countries can’t handle, American vines were important to England and Europe.

Unfortunately, these vines came with a little pest that attack grapes.  The wine grapes in these areas had no natural resistance to the pest – so wine production was almost halted in Europe for a time. After the pest was discovered, winemakers developed a work-around.  They grafted their grapes to American rootstock, which has a resistance to the pests.

The practice of grafting in order to improve a grape varieties’ chance of survival continues to this day.

How to Graft

The process of grafting is pretty simple, but requires a lot of skill and expertise. Basically:

1. The root onto which the plant will be grafted is planted and allowed to establish itself.

2. Any trunks growing from the root are cut down to the ground at a spot which is approximately the same size as the trunk of the plant to be grafted.

3. A cut is made both in the trunk and the plant which is to be grafted on.  The plant and trunk are notched together.

4. They are then tied together with a material to keep the graft in place.

5. Soil is used as an additional support and as a moist surface which will help the plant heal more swiftly.

In the end, you have the varietal you want to grow attached to a root which will give it the protection and nutrients it needs to produce fantastic wine.  We can all raise a glass to that!

 

Looking for Youngberg Hill Wines?

February 26th, 2014 by Nicolette Bailey

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If you aren’t able to visit us at Youngberg Hill to enjoy our wines in person, here is a list of retail shops where you can find our wine.  If these shops are inconvenient to you, we are happy to ship direct to wherever you are.  If the store listed doesn’t have our wine in stock, ask them to order it in as it is available to them.

Of course if you are in the area, we would love for you to visit our tasting room on the Hill, and sample all of the vintages of Youngberg Hill wines we have to offer.  We’ve recently added a beautiful deck, and the view is outrageous!

 

Portland, OR ( and surrounding area) – Korkage, Primrose & Tumbleweeds, Lamb’s Stroheckers, Fred Meyer – Burlingame, Whole Foods – Bridgeport, Blackbird Wine Shop, Wine Up, Whole Foods – Tanasbourne, New Seasons, QFC -Stadium

Eugene, OR – Sundance

Jacksonville, OR- Corks, Jacksonville Inn, & Chateaulin-Ashland

Bend, OR- Rays-Sisters, Good Drop Wine Shop, Wine Shop next to 900 Wall

Salem,OR- Roth’s

Oregon Coast – Cellar on 10th in Astoria, Wine Shack in Cannon Beach

Seattle, WA – Wine World & Bottlehouse.

Minnesota- Byerly’s ( Burnsville, Golden Valley, Maple Grove and Ridgedale),  Excelsior Vintage, Lake Wine and cheese Shop, Lund’s Plymouth, Lund’s Wine & Spirits Downtown, Mike’s Liquor, North Loop wine and Spirits, Skyway Wine & Spirits, Mike’s Liquor, North Loop Wine and Spiritis, Skyway Wine & Spirits, Sorella Wine & Spirits, Thomas Liquors, Wine & Spirits at 7 & 41, Zipps Liquors.

Chicago – Wine Knows, Everetts Liquor, The Noble Grape (will special order), Five Forks Market All Wined Up, Select Beverages, The Tasting Room and City Winery.

 

Holistic Farming: Our Approach to Growing Grapes

February 18th, 2014 by Rachel

Organic farming is inherent in the culture here in Oregon.  Our state is among the top five states in number of certified organic farms.  Even more farms utilize organic practices, but don’t go through the costly certification process.  Instead, they farm organically because it’s the right thing to do.

seriously organic winesGenerally speaking, organic farms are those which do not utilize synthetic pesticides or fertilizers.  At Youngberg Hill, we take it a step farther by using a biodynamic philosophy when growing our grapes.  This means we do not poison our soil with synthetic pesticides or fertilizers.  Instead, we consider the farm from a holistic perspective.  We look at the balance of our ecosystem and work to generate health and fertility naturally – within the farm itself.

There are a number of grasses and other local plants growing on our farm.  These give a home to local insects, which feed local birds.  These plants give and take nutrition from the soil.  Their lives and their deaths enrich the ground in which our vines grow.

We don’t use chemical fertilizers to pump up tired soil.  Instead, we work to maintain the rich soil nature provided us with when we first came to Youngberg Hill.

Why do we take so much care to create a natural environment in our farm?  There are two reasons:

1st: We want our wine to tell the story of the land in which the grapes were grown and how nature affected each and every grape.  We believe in letting nature speak for itself in the clarity and flavor of our wines.

2nd: Youngberg Hill is a family owned and operated farm.  Our girls are growing up here. We want to raise our grapes in the same healthy environment in which we are raising our girls.

Our philosophy and way of farming has kept our family happy and healthy – and has made us able to produce award winning wines year after year.

Have you heard of Holistic Farming? What are your thoughts on this with regard to wine? 

 

How to Taste Wine Properly

February 4th, 2014 by Rachel

youngberg hill tasting roomWe have all heard that wine tasting is a complicated process.  You have probably been given advice on how to taste wine – usually this includes:

a)     Look at the color of the wine to discover its clarity, depth, and saturation.

b)     Smell the wine

c)      Swirl the wine in your glass.

d)     Note how slowly it runs back down the side of the glass while you’re swirling.  This is called viscosity.

e)     Smell the wine again.

f)      Take a sip of the wine and roll it around your mouth so as to expose it to all of your taste buds.

g)     Note the aftertaste.

There can be more steps involved for the professional wine taster, but those are the basics.

However, when going wine tasting, the most important thing to note is what we like to call the “yuck” or “yum” factor.  That is: do you like it?  If so, what do you like about it?  If not, what don’t you like about it?

The first part is easy.  Just taste the wine and discover if you enjoy the texture, smell, and flavor.

The second part is more difficult.  Discovering what you specifically like or dislike about the wine can be tough to describe.  Taste is a deeply personal experience and how one person describes a taste can be completely different from the description of another person who is sipping the exact same wine.

So, how do you describe your taste in wine to a store, restaurant, or winery? Here are four tips:

  1. When you taste a wine you like – find out how the winery described it.  You can do this in the tasting room by speaking with the person who is conducting the tasting and asking them for tasting notes, discussing specifics of the year the wine was produced, and finding out how it was aged.However, you aren’t always in a tasting room when sipping a glass of wine.  You may be at home or out at dinner.  You can check the bottle for descriptions or note down the wine you ordered and Google the tasting notes later on.
  2. When you taste a wine you don’t like, do the same thing.  No one really wants to remember the wine they didn’t care for, but understanding why you didn’t care for it will help you buy wines you enjoy more in future.  So, find out about the wine, discover how the taste or smell you didn’t care for is described, and don’t buy wine with those characteristics in future.
  3. Consider what it’s paired with.  The way you perceive taste changes as you eat and drink wine.  You might be enjoying your food and wine more than you would if they were not paired.  On the flip side, you may really dislike your wine because of a bad pairing. 
  4. Find out what certain descriptive terms mean.  Some very common terms used when discussing wine are:

Rich – Wine which shows ripeness and viscosity.  This is something you can discern from the legs which form when you swirl your wine and from the depth of color.

High Acidity – This describes a tart and zesty taste.  When describing reds; “high acidity” usually means it’s lighter in color and tastes tart.  When describing whites; this often means a lemon or lime taste.

Oaked – This means the wine was aged in an oak barrel.  The type of oak used in the barrel itself can have a huge impact on the taste of wine.  But, when you’re talking tastebuds, the “oak” tastes in wine are the non-grape related tastes.  Common “oak” tastes are vanilla, butter, and coconut in whites and spice, vanilla, and dill in reds.

UnOaked – Wines are not always aged in oak.  Wines which are unoaked are often more zesty and tart.

Buttery – Often describes a white that has been aged in oak and has low acidity. It has a creamy texture and a smooth finish.

Floral – A smell or taste of flowers or blossoms.  This is opposed to a fruity taste or smell.

We could go on and on talking about terms used to describe wine, but these are some of the basics.

Just remember, when tasting wine, it’s all about your very personal taste.  Be sure to keep that in mind when you next go out for a wine tasting or sip on a glass of wine at a restaurant.

What are your personal wine tastes? COMMENT below and share with us…

3 Reasons to Visit Willamette Valley

January 27th, 2014 by Nicolette Bailey

Willamette ValleyThe Willamette Valley is arguably one of the best known regions in Oregon.  The fertile soils of the Willamette Valley are known to produce some of the world’s most exquisite Pinot Noir wines, and it is Oregon’s leading wine-producing region.  Willamette Valley is home to two-thirds of Oregon’s wineries and vineyards, making it an ideal wine tourist destination.  Enjoy a day spent touring a select few of the more than 150 Willamette Valley Wineries with our wine driving tour.  At Youngberg Hill Vineyards & Inn, we have 20 total acres with three distinct blocks of Pinot Noir and one block of Pinot Gris, all of which are organically and sustainably farmed.  The wonderful combination of soils and weather found in the Willamette Valley are perfectly suited for the growth of Pinot Noir, resulting in high quality fruit with rich, intense black fruit flavors, earthy minerality, and high acidity.  We take immense pride in the wines produced here.  Stop in to our tasting room, which is open 7 days a week, and experience the delicious complexity of Youngberg Hill wines.

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Willamette Valley Geology 101 | Youngberg Hill

January 6th, 2014 by Nicolette Bailey

dirt 2As farmers, we wine grape growers have a strong interest in the soils our vines are planted in. When we explain to guests the different characteristics of our soils, we are often asked how the soils got there and why they are so different from one another. During such a discussion with some recent guests, we were fortunate to have among them a geologist who was visiting.  He not only took a strong interest in our explanation, but had additional information to share as well.  For all of our “dirt-geek” readers, and for those who just want to learn more, his research points can be read in the following pdf .  We are thankful to have such interested and passionate guests who want to join the discussion about wine farming, and welcome your comments on the topic of soil in the Willamette Valley!

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2013 Oregon Wine Vintage in Review

December 16th, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

Harvest 2013 104Oh what a beautiful October we had!  Many wine grape growers in the area say that September weather determines how good of a year we have for the vintage. I believe that October tells a good story of vintage quality but its not the whole story. While much of the ripening takes place in September, October is when everything comes together.

2013 Oregon wine vintage was no exception. The growing season started early with an early spring, and that timing continued throughout the season. The summer proved to be a little warmer than normal which also had things moving along a little faster. The combination resulted in ripening happening in warmer conditions, moving sugars and acids ahead of other ripening factors, which may throw the resulting wines out of balance. This caused some farmers to become concerned that the grapes were going to need to be harvested early and that the resulting wines would be high in alcohol.

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Wine Club at Youngberg Hill

November 25th, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

Thanksgiving 2013 edit 001It is release time for the 2011 vintage, and the perfect time to join our Wine Club!

Wine clubs are a great way to keep in touch with wineries that you enjoy, to keep your wine cellar stocked, to try new vintages before the general public gets to, and to receive and/or purchase wines or vintages that are only available to wine club members. In fact, there are some entire vintages that are only available to wine club members.

A Wine club membership provides discounts on purchases for semi-annual shipments and on other orders. Members are also invited to participate in special events throughout the year including winemaker’s dinners, free tastings, wine tours, barrel tastings, club pickup events, blending parties, and more. Wine clubs also provide opportunities to enjoy wines that are not released to the general public or stores.

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Celebrate Fall in Oregon Wine Country

September 9th, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

Oregon Wine country fallIf you’re interested in sampling some of the country’s finest Pinor Noir wines, then fall is a wonderful time to plan a trip to Oregon Wine Country. Throughout the fall months, the hillsides across the Willamette Valley are radiant with the colors of fall.  Deep purple grapes are set against a backdrop of the brilliant oranges, bright yellows, and deep reds associated with the harvest season.  Driving through the valley is stunning, only made better when you stop in our amazing tasting room to sample the wines produced here.

As we head into the fall months, Willamette Valley Wineries are busy getting ready for the harvest season.  If you’re looking for some harvest-related fun, then head to the 23rd annual Grape Stomp and Harvest Celebration at Willamette Valley Vineyards on September 21st and 22nd.  Visitors from all over the country compete in teams for the title, as well as to earn a trip to Santa Rosa, California for the World Grape Stomp Championships.  Come dressed in costumes, enjoy the live music, and get ready for some great family fun in Oregon Wine Country.  On Saturday, October 5th, spend the day with the North Willamette Vintners as they prepare for the 2013 Oregon wine harvest during the North Willamette Harvest Trail and Grand Tasting.  Here, you’ll learn all about the wine harvest, and enjoy a guided bus tour to three different Willamette Valley wineries for tastings and other harvest-related activities.  At Youngberg Hill Vineyards, we’re always looking for volunteers to help us with sorting during the fall harvest.  If you’re interested, please email us for more information.

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