Posts Tagged ‘Oregon Pinot noir’

2015 Vintage in the Willamette Valley

January 9th, 2016 by Nicolette Bailey

Harvest 2013 1042015 vintage in the Willamette Valley was a banner year for growing Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, and other grape varietals, especially at Youngberg Hill.

I’m sure you have heard a lot about the on the west coast 2015 drought and its impact on agriculture. In the Willamette Valley, we are blessed with plenty of rain during the off season that sustains us through the dry growing months.  In fact, we don’t want any rain during the growing season. Because of this, we didn’t suffer from lack of water even though Youngberg Hill is a dry farm. What was a challenge this last year was the heat.  It required us to be more diligent in our management of the canopy and protecting the fruit from the sun. In addition, we took more time and care cutting off dried and sunburnt fruit from the vine before harvest. And in a wonderful turn of events, September turned ouIMG_8304[1]t to be cooler than normal which slowed down ripening and gave us fruit that is very well balanced. All of these factors combined should make 2015 the best vintage ever for Youngberg Hill!

In December, we bottled the Pinot Noir’s from the 2014 vintage, and are excited to share them with the world upon their release in September of 2016. While 2014 vintage was also a warmer year, the fruit aged beautifully in the barrel and is showing just as good as the renown 2012 vintage. In the meantime, the newly released 2013 vintage is tasting great right out of the bottle.

join our wine clubLooking forward, 2016 looks to be another great year as the age of the vines and health of the vineyard continues to improve. Youngberg Hill’s organic and biodynamic farming practices are really paying off both in the health of the vines and also in the quality of the fruit.

We wish everyone a great 2016! Cheers!

Wine Taste in the Willamette Valley Year-Round

December 7th, 2015 by Nicolette Bailey

Go-Wine-Tasting-Wine-Country-ThanksgivingAre you looking for an adventure after Thanksgiving?  Did you know that you can wine taste in the Willamette Valley year-round?  Although many wineries close their tasting room or shorten their hours after Thanksgiving, there are still more than 100 wineries that continue to remain open all year long. With weather that lends itself well to wine drinking, and smaller crowds, now is a great time to enjoy Willamette Valley wineries.  Don’t just come for the wine tasting; there are many other activities for you to enjoy.

Let’s start with drinks. If you want a break from drinking wine, try one of the many microbreweries in the valley like Heater Allen, Golden Valley, Grain Station, Chehalem Valley, Deception, and Fire Mountain. Most of these are open all year long with delicious seasonal brews available for limited times of the year.  If you’re in the mood for a cocktail, then you have to go to Thistle.  Other great places to enjoy a cocktail is at Nick’s, The Barberry, Pura Vida, and La Rambla.

Take advantage of the amazing restaurants!  Fine dining in the area includes Bistro Maison, Nick’s, Tha7b82faaa1d49b0795d454f11fc64c5ce Painted Lady, Joel Palmer House, Tina’s, Recipe, The Barberry, Thistle, La Rambla and many more. If you’d like a less formal dining experience, there is always Golden Valley, Valley Commissary, Grain Station, The Blue Goat, and Pura Vida.

Besides libations and food, there are many more things to discover in this area.  Want to go shopping? McMinnville’s main street captures the feeling of the main streets of old with a variety of local stores, shops, tasting rooms and music. Carlton is home to many tasting rooms that include producers from other Oregon wine growing regions. McMinnville is also home to Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum, one of the top ten airplane museums in the world.

With all of these things for you to enjoy, it’s hard to believe your only an hour south of Portland, less than an hour from the coast, and two hours from the snowy slopes of Mt. Hood.  So if you thought that wine touring in the Willamette Valley was only a summer time activity, think again. Don’t let our light rain deter you, come for the wine and food, and take advantage of all Oregon has to offer year-round.

November Wine Touring in the Willamette Valley

November 16th, 2015 by Nicolette Bailey

Is thGregor Halenda Travel Oregon Jessis a good time to go wine touring in Oregon?  November wine touring in the Willamette Valley is a great time to taste Pinot Noirs. There are over 300 tasting rooms throughout the valley, and most all of them are open through the Thanksgiving weekend. Additionally, most of us in the valley are releasing new wines, having pick-up parties, wine club events, and winemaker dinners throughout the months of November and December. It is a great time to be out in wine country, celebrating the bountiful harvest.

With the holidays approaching, it is a great time to stock up on your party wines and dinner wines for the festive season. Many wineries offer wine specials during this time of year.

When you’re traveling through Oregon’s Wine Country, the restaurants in the area offer great dining experiences. Which dining experience is best for you? Ask around and be prepared to have a lot of options. To make your wine tasting tours easier there are several touring businesses to drive you from tasting room to tasting room. Most also offer dinner service, which is a ride to and from dinner.Fall vineard

It used to be that the “season” for tasting in Willamette Valley wine country was from Memorial Weekend until Thanksgiving. Today the “season” is all year long as many wineries are open for tasting, restaurants are open for lunch and dinner, and warm and cozy B&Bs are open to with nice fireplaces to cuddle up and enjoy that bottle of Oregon Pinot. Even after the holidays, there are plenty of places to go, wines to taste, and places to stay and eat. In January, the Oregon Truffle Festival takes place. In February, there are many Valentine events. And as March rolls around, white wines for spring and summer begin to be released.

There is never a “closed” time in the Willamette Valley.

Bottling 2014 Pinot Noir in the Willamette Valley

November 2nd, 2015 by Nicolette Bailey

IMG_1059When do we bottle Pinot Noir in Willamette Valley? It’s about this time of year when Oregon Wineries move the previous year’s harvest from barrels to bottles. This is a great time to revisit last year’s harvest, and explore this wine after it’s spent some time in the barrel. 2014 was a rare year for Oregon Pinot Noir. Across the board, Willamette Valley vineyards harvested not only a large quantity of fruit, but more importantly the harvested fruit was of a high quality. All too often one is sacrificed for the benefit of the other, but not in 2014. That year began with an early spring that continued into warmer than normal weather throughout the growing season. This combination brought in a harvest two to three weeks earlier than normal, a time of year that saw very little precipitation. Often times, late in the growing season, vineyards are at the mercy of the weather, hoping for enough dry days to pick ripe fruit. As a combined result, the 2014 wines in barrel are showing ripe, voluptuous body and weight.

Bottling Pinot Noir in the Willamette Valley typically takes place right before harvest in late August and September. The machines used to bottle wine are large, and require specially trained operators. Because of this, a lot of smaller wineries hire a mobile botting unit. When it is time for bottling the mobile unit is pulled to the winery.DSCN1218

Once bottled, the wine is left to age in bottle for at least another 6 months before release. However, Youngberg Hill typically release our Pinot Noirs 2 years after the fruit was harvested, so don’t expect to see these wines before November of 2016. At Youngberg Hill, our Pinot Noirs are bigger and bolder than most of the other wines produced in the valley. Because of this, we give them more time in the barrel. We normally keep our Pinot Noir in barrel for at least 12 months or more. With the 2014 vintage being special, we will hold the wine in our French White Oak barrels for 14 months. This additional time in the barrel will impart more of the oak flavor, complementing the bigger fruit flavor of the 2014 harvest. We believe this will ultimately create a superb and well balanced Pinot Noir.

 

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Making Pinot Noir in The Willamette Valley

October 6th, 2015 by Nicolette Bailey

DSC_6902Many of us who make Pinot Noir in the Willamette Valley either learned our wine-making trade in Burgundy or aspire to make wines in a manner similar to Burgundy. What does that mean? It means using a light touch in the winery to let the wine reflect where the fruit was grown and what weather the fruit was grown in. This philosophy creates wines that will be very different across the valley and vary significantly from year to year.

How is this done? We do this by doing as little as possible in the winery to change the natural characteristics coming from the fruit. An example of that is “crush”. While we all envision Lucy stomping on the grapes in that classic TV episode and in some regions with some varietals, we take great care in not “crushing the grapes before going into fermentation. Because Pinot Noir is a feminine grape with thin skins, it is important not to bruise the fruit, which will change the characteristics of the wine. We also take care not to make any adjustments to the wine like adding acid if it is a low acid year, adding sugar if it is a low sugar year, or adding water if it is a high sugar year. We use the saying “It is what it is”.

I often use the analogy of raising children to wine-making. If you try to make a rocket scientist out of a child with innate skills as a concert pianist, he probably wouldn’t be as good a rocket scientist as he would be a concert pianist. In the same way, if one tries to manipulate the wine to taste a certain way, it is most likely not going to be as good a wine as if it is left to reflect the fruit it is made from.

Finally, the wine will go into barrel, typically French white oak for our Pinot Noirs) for anywhere from 14 to 24 months depending on the vintage and the fruit. After barreling, we will bottle and hold for several months before releasing typically  two years from the time it was harvested.

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Reasons You Must Visit the Oregon Wine Country

August 5th, 2014 by Rachel

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The Yamhill Valley is in the heart of the Oregon Wine Country. It’s filled with a rich history, compassion and great wine, of course. It is a huge part of our area’s economic, agricultural and social landscape.

 

 

 

  • Oregon Pinot Noir is famous, and rightfully so! In the 1960s and 70s, a group of wine entrepreneurs settled in the Yamhill Valley with pinot grapes on their minds. Two of those winemakers championed setting aside a significant part of the area for vineyards. This partnership with the state of Oregon has led to over four decades of agricultural and economic success in the area, not to mention amazing Pinot Noir!
  • In Oregon, wine means more than just the bottom line, there is a lot of care and dedication taken into providing the best product the right way.

Aug Blog 1- Pic 2In 1991, 18 wine producers started ¡Salud!, a charity committed to providing comprehensive health care for migrant workers at the vineyards. It was the first organization of its kind in the entire country.

  • When you visit the Oregon Wine Country, you’ll see how much pride is involved in what we do here. It is such a big part of our community that there are now multiple exhibits and archives keeping our rich history alive.
  • Aug Blog 1- Pic 3In 2011, Linfield College started the Oregon Wine History Archive, preserving the stories of our pivotal industry.
    • This year, the Oregon Historical Society established a temporary exhibit full of interactive displays and a tasting room. Clink! will be available through September 20.

 

For more information on the history of the Oregon Wine Country, we recommend this article from the Oregonian.

 

 

 

Youngberg Hill Vineyard and Inn

July 29th, 2014 by Rachel

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Founded in 1989, Youngberg Hill Vineyard and Inn has become a staple of the Yamhill Valley and McMinnville Winegrowers Association. We focus on premium Oregon Pinot Noirs and excellent service for all our guests.

 

The Vineyard

The vineyards at Youngberg Hill lie in the coastal foothills of Yamhill Valley, just 25 miles away from the coast. The unique location has given us rich and diverse soil to grow amazing Pinot grapes for the past 25 years. Our first two Pinot Noir blocks in the vineyard were planted in 1989, followed by our one block of Pinot Gris in 2006 and our third Pinot Noir crop in 2008.

We are on a mission to practice organic and sustainable farming at Youngberg Hill. In 2010 we were certified “Sustainable” by the Oregon Wine Board, after gaining certifications from other third party organizations. In an effort to leave the earth healthier than how we found it, we only employ soft pesticides, such as biodegradable soaps and oils, on our vines. The caution and care shown to the plants is evident in the quality of Youngberg Hill wines.

Youngberg Hill, McMinnville, Willamette Valley, OregonThe Inn

With views from the deck overlooking the Coast Range, Mount Jefferson, Mount Hood, and of course the vineyards, the Youngberg Hill Inn offers a chance for a breathtaking getaway. Whether you stay in one of the five king suites or three queen guestrooms, you’re guaranteed to feel comfortable and pampered. In the mornings you can treat yourself to a gourmet breakfast or relax in the first floor library or salon. In the evening there are complimentary wine tastings where you can enjoy a famous Oregon Pinot Noir out on our deck.

Whether you come for a tasting or an overnight stay, Youngberg Hill’s goal is to provide high-quality service for a relaxing and satisfying visit.

Have you stayed with us before? Let us know about your experience in the comments!

Book your stay today!

How Does Grafting Wine Grapes Work?

July 1st, 2014 by Rachel

July Blog 1 - Pic 1Many wine grapes in the US are grafted on – meaning the root of the grape plant isn’t the exact same strain as the top of the plant.  This is often a way of strengthening delicate grape types by giving it a hardier or more pest resistant root system.

Grafting wine grapes can also be used by winemakers to replace existing grapes with a new type.  So, if a winery wanted to grow Chardonnay where they were growing Pinot Noir, they would only have to graft Chardonnay grapes onto the existing roots.  This means a winery can begin producing the new grapes much more swiftly than if they had dug up their previous grapes and planted a whole new grape plant.

Why do Many Wineries Graft?

The majority of wine grapes you hear about are grafted onto rootstock due to an American pest. Back before we had officials to check whether certain plants carried disease or bugs that the ecosystem of other countries can’t handle, American vines were important to England and Europe.

Unfortunately, these vines came with a little pest that attack grapes.  The wine grapes in these areas had no natural resistance to the pest – so wine production was almost halted in Europe for a time. After the pest was discovered, winemakers developed a work-around.  They grafted their grapes to American rootstock, which has a resistance to the pests.

The practice of grafting in order to improve a grape varieties’ chance of survival continues to this day.

How to Graft

The process of grafting is pretty simple, but requires a lot of skill and expertise. Basically:

1. The root onto which the plant will be grafted is planted and allowed to establish itself.

2. Any trunks growing from the root are cut down to the ground at a spot which is approximately the same size as the trunk of the plant to be grafted.

3. A cut is made both in the trunk and the plant which is to be grafted on.  The plant and trunk are notched together.

4. They are then tied together with a material to keep the graft in place.

5. Soil is used as an additional support and as a moist surface which will help the plant heal more swiftly.

In the end, you have the varietal you want to grow attached to a root which will give it the protection and nutrients it needs to produce fantastic wine.  We can all raise a glass to that!

 

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Looking for Youngberg Hill Wines?

February 26th, 2014 by Nicolette Bailey

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If you aren’t able to visit us at Youngberg Hill to enjoy our wines in person, here is a list of retail shops where you can find our wine.  If these shops are inconvenient to you, we are happy to ship direct to wherever you are.  If the store listed doesn’t have our wine in stock, ask them to order it in as it is available to them.

Of course if you are in the area, we would love for you to visit our tasting room on the Hill, and sample all of the vintages of Youngberg Hill wines we have to offer.  We’ve recently added a beautiful deck, and the view is outrageous!

 

Portland, OR ( and surrounding area) – Korkage, Primrose & Tumbleweeds, Lamb’s Stroheckers, Fred Meyer – Burlingame, Whole Foods – Bridgeport, Blackbird Wine Shop, Wine Up, Whole Foods – Tanasbourne, New Seasons, QFC -Stadium

Eugene, OR – Sundance

Jacksonville, OR– Corks, Jacksonville Inn, & Chateaulin-Ashland

Bend, OR– Rays-Sisters, Good Drop Wine Shop, Wine Shop next to 900 Wall

Salem,OR– Roth’s

Oregon Coast – Cellar on 10th in Astoria, Wine Shack in Cannon Beach

Seattle, WA – Wine World & Bottlehouse.

Minnesota– Byerly’s ( Burnsville, Golden Valley, Maple Grove and Ridgedale),  Excelsior Vintage, Lake Wine and cheese Shop, Lund’s Plymouth, Lund’s Wine & Spirits Downtown, Mike’s Liquor, North Loop wine and Spirits, Skyway Wine & Spirits, Mike’s Liquor, North Loop Wine and Spiritis, Skyway Wine & Spirits, Sorella Wine & Spirits, Thomas Liquors, Wine & Spirits at 7 & 41, Zipps Liquors.

Chicago – Wine Knows, Everetts Liquor, The Noble Grape (will special order), Five Forks Market All Wined Up, Select Beverages, The Tasting Room and City Winery.

 

Holistic Farming: Our Approach to Growing Grapes

February 18th, 2014 by Rachel

Organic farming is inherent in the culture here in Oregon.  Our state is among the top five states in number of certified organic farms.  Even more farms utilize organic practices, but don’t go through the costly certification process.  Instead, they farm organically because it’s the right thing to do.

seriously organic winesGenerally speaking, organic farms are those which do not utilize synthetic pesticides or fertilizers.  At Youngberg Hill, we take it a step farther by using a biodynamic philosophy when growing our grapes.  This means we do not poison our soil with synthetic pesticides or fertilizers.  Instead, we consider the farm from a holistic perspective.  We look at the balance of our ecosystem and work to generate health and fertility naturally – within the farm itself.

There are a number of grasses and other local plants growing on our farm.  These give a home to local insects, which feed local birds.  These plants give and take nutrition from the soil.  Their lives and their deaths enrich the ground in which our vines grow.

We don’t use chemical fertilizers to pump up tired soil.  Instead, we work to maintain the rich soil nature provided us with when we first came to Youngberg Hill.

Why do we take so much care to create a natural environment in our farm?  There are two reasons:

1st: We want our wine to tell the story of the land in which the grapes were grown and how nature affected each and every grape.  We believe in letting nature speak for itself in the clarity and flavor of our wines.

2nd: Youngberg Hill is a family owned and operated farm.  Our girls are growing up here. We want to raise our grapes in the same healthy environment in which we are raising our girls.

Our philosophy and way of farming has kept our family happy and healthy – and has made us able to produce award winning wines year after year.

Have you heard of Holistic Farming? What are your thoughts on this with regard to wine?