Posts Tagged ‘wine country’

5 ways to Celebrate Oregon Wine Month in the Willamette Valley

April 5th, 2016 by Nicolette Bailey

Oregon wine month 2016May is Oregon Wine Month in the Willamette Valley, and we couldn’t think of a better time to enjoy all that this area has to offer. The following are five ways to get out and explore the lesser visited parts of the Willamette Valley.

  1. 3rd Street in downtown McMinnville: This is a hub for a variety of activities. Wander the sidewalks exploring the many locally owned boutique shops lining the street, or enjoy one of the several top notch restaurants such as Bistro Maison, Nick’s, Thistle, and the Barberry. While also on 3rd Street, stop by the Elizabeth Chambers Cellar for a wine tasting.
  2. McMinnville AVA: This viticulture area is the place to enjoy exquisite wines that are distinguished for their depth, complexity, bold structure, and black fruit. Enjoy less crowded tasting rooms, unique views, beautiful structures, and friendly hospitality at these family owned wineries. You’ll be treated to all of these things at Youngberg Hill, Coeur de Terre, Yamhill Valley, Maysara, Coleman, and J Wrigley.
  3. Eola Hills AVA: Travel over to McMinnville’s neighboring wine growing area to taste the difference that a few miles can make. Spend a day visiting Brooks, Bethel Heights, and Cristom. Make a lunch stop in Amity at the Blue Goat for fresh, local fare before continuing your wine tasting adventures at Coelho Winery.
  4. Yamhill-Carlton: This town is where you’ll find many small wine producers making great quality wines that you wouldn’t be able to find elsewhere. Carlton is also home to several tasting rooms for wineries from other parts of Oregon pouring bigger red varietals.
  5. The Oregon Coast: Ok, this may not be technically part of the Willamette Valley, but it is only a short trip from the heart of the valley. Many people don’t know that McMinnville is only 45 to 50 minutes from the Pacific Ocean.  Not only are there great beaches and views in Pacific City, there are many great restaurants along Hwy 101 from Pacific City to Newport. Take a break from wine tasting and head to the beach, enjoy some fresh seafood, and Oregon wines.

4 Reasons to choose a Bed & Breakfast in the Willamette Valley

February 3rd, 2016 by Nicolette Bailey

When trTripadvisor Certificate of Excellenceaveling through the Willamette Valley in Oregon, a bed & breakfast might not be your first lodging choice, but here are four reasons why it should be number one.

Let’s start at the beginning: breakfast. Nothing starts a day better than a delicious homemade breakfast, and that is exactly what you’ll get at a bed & breakfast.  Wake up to the wafting smells of freshly brewed coffee and breakfast being prepared by hand and with love. The breakfast you’ll enjoy is unique and different from that which you might normally prepare at home or have at a hotel.  Even if you don’t normally start your day with a full breakfast, while in the Willamette Valley, you may want to enjoy the morning meal.  After all, it is important to wake up your taste buds, and fill your stomach, prior to a day of wine tasting.  It will feel like home, but taste like a restaurant.

The second reason to stay at a bed and breakfast is for the serene experience. Unplug, and detox from all the hustle and bustle of your everyday life in a beautiful Willamette Valley bed and breakfast.  Located in rural locations, these establishments provide spectacular views, quiet and serene environments, limited light pollution, easy access to nature, and the relaxation of not having to do anything but drink wine.

Reason number three on why you should stay at a bed & breakfast is the people.  Bed and breakfasts are congregation areas for people that are passionate about good wine, good food, and enjoying both while relaxing and taking in the beautiful surroundings.  You’ll have unique opportunities to meet new people from all over the world. It is always amazing how many connections are made, new friendships established, and storiea Inn guest review of Youngberg Hills shared by people from different places and lives. At Youngberg Hill, you have multiple opportunities to meet with your fellow travelers not only at breakfast, but also during the exclusive wine tasting reception hour; just another opportunity to taste great pinot noirs of the Willamette Valley!

The final reason you need to stay at a bed & breakfast is the service.  Guests have exclusive access to some of the most knowledgeable people around: the owners and innkeepers.  These people are your built-in concierge service, there to help you navigate the innumerable wineries, dozens of restaurants for lunch and dinner, and other activities during your time in the valley. Knowing the local scene, logistics of getting around in the valley, realistic travel times, and where to have the best experiences are all worth their weight in gold when it comes to making your Willamette Valley experience remarkable.  They are there to make your trip as effortless and enjoyable as possible.

So the next time you think about visiting the Willamette Valley in Oregon, treat yourself and stay at a bed and breakfast.

Enjoying February Wine in the Willamette Valley

January 20th, 2016 by Nicolette Bailey

Couple drinking wine in Oregon at Youngberg Hill.Have you thought about enjoying Willamette Valley wine country during February? True it rains much of the time, but what better excuse than the weather to snuggle up next to a warm fire with your loved one and enjoy a delicious Pinot Noir? There is a lot happening in the Willamette Valley during the month of February with many Valentine’s events at different wineries with chocolate and wine pairings, new releases, and winemaker’s dinners.   Don’t forget about the local restaurants, which will be having spectacular dinner specials.

Wine tasting in the Willamette Valley

It is fun to taste throughout the Willamette Valley this time of year because of the unique and serendipitous experiences one might have. To start, it is typically not as busy in the tasting rooms so you can have a more intimate tasting experience, learn more about the wines and why they taste the way they do. This gives you the opportunity to meet the winemaker or owner hanging around who are willing to share their experiences with you and maybe even break out a library wine or take you to the barrel room. Many of us wineries are family operations and you may have the opportunity to meet other members of the family developing a more intimate relationship with the family, the winery, and the entire operation.

There are plenty of wineries open for tasting throughout the winter months which means that there is no lack of both old favorites and new experiences to enjoy. Visit Youngberg Hill’s tasting room and relax next to the fire while tasting the newly released 2013 vintages, or join us on February 12th for our annual Valentine’s dinner with outstanding chocolate charged menu items paired with some of our favorite Youngberg Hill wines.

And there nothing that puts a little heat back in the relationship than a couple of nights at our cozy intimate inn overlooking the vineyard. Snuggle up in front of your private fireplace and enjoy a glass, or a bottle, of your favorite Youngberg Hill Pinot Noir with the person you adore.

cta_wine

2015 Vintage in the Willamette Valley

January 9th, 2016 by Nicolette Bailey

Harvest 2013 1042015 vintage in the Willamette Valley was a banner year for growing Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, and other grape varietals, especially at Youngberg Hill.

I’m sure you have heard a lot about the on the west coast 2015 drought and its impact on agriculture. In the Willamette Valley, we are blessed with plenty of rain during the off season that sustains us through the dry growing months.  In fact, we don’t want any rain during the growing season. Because of this, we didn’t suffer from lack of water even though Youngberg Hill is a dry farm. What was a challenge this last year was the heat.  It required us to be more diligent in our management of the canopy and protecting the fruit from the sun. In addition, we took more time and care cutting off dried and sunburnt fruit from the vine before harvest. And in a wonderful turn of events, September turned ouIMG_8304[1]t to be cooler than normal which slowed down ripening and gave us fruit that is very well balanced. All of these factors combined should make 2015 the best vintage ever for Youngberg Hill!

In December, we bottled the Pinot Noir’s from the 2014 vintage, and are excited to share them with the world upon their release in September of 2016. While 2014 vintage was also a warmer year, the fruit aged beautifully in the barrel and is showing just as good as the renown 2012 vintage. In the meantime, the newly released 2013 vintage is tasting great right out of the bottle.

join our wine clubLooking forward, 2016 looks to be another great year as the age of the vines and health of the vineyard continues to improve. Youngberg Hill’s organic and biodynamic farming practices are really paying off both in the health of the vines and also in the quality of the fruit.

We wish everyone a great 2016! Cheers!

Truffles and Mushrooms in the Willamette Valley

December 21st, 2015 by Nicolette Bailey

Oregon-Truffle-FestivalWhile the Willamette Valley is known for Pinot Noir, it’s also a great area for mushrooms. While there are a variety of seasonal mushrooms available throughout the year, Oregon truffles and mushrooms in the Willamette Valley are the seasonal favorite. Both native black and white truffles are hunted here every winter.  Mushrooms are so good here that they are the driving force behind The Joel Palmer House restaurant in Dayton, Oregon, which was founded by the son of a legendary Pennsylvania restaurateur who was passionate about mushrooms.

Oregon is also blessed with an abundance of wild truffles with culinary qualities equal to those of Europe, and as with French grapes, Oregon has the perfect climate for cultivation of the renowned French truffles. As the ultimate culinary delicacies, truffles are emblematic of the good life in every region where they grow, and in Oregon they are complemented by our wealth of other wild and cultivated gourmet foods, outstanding Oregon wines, and an increasing number of extraordinarily talented and award winning chefs.

The Oregon Truffle Festival is dedicated to the celebration of these delicious fungi.  It will be celebrating its tenth year of activities across the Willamette Valley beginning in January 2016 with activities from the 16th through the 31st. These activities will include growing your own, dog training and hunting competition, Pinot Noir pairings, dinners and luncheons, and also a market for you to pick up some truffles to take home with you. For more information, go to http://www.oregontrufflefestival.com/.

And while in The Valley, don’t forget to take advantage of all the other culinary and wine activities available throughout the winter. Cheers!

Wine Taste in the Willamette Valley Year-Round

December 7th, 2015 by Nicolette Bailey

Go-Wine-Tasting-Wine-Country-ThanksgivingAre you looking for an adventure after Thanksgiving?  Did you know that you can wine taste in the Willamette Valley year-round?  Although many wineries close their tasting room or shorten their hours after Thanksgiving, there are still more than 100 wineries that continue to remain open all year long. With weather that lends itself well to wine drinking, and smaller crowds, now is a great time to enjoy Willamette Valley wineries.  Don’t just come for the wine tasting; there are many other activities for you to enjoy.

Let’s start with drinks. If you want a break from drinking wine, try one of the many microbreweries in the valley like Heater Allen, Golden Valley, Grain Station, Chehalem Valley, Deception, and Fire Mountain. Most of these are open all year long with delicious seasonal brews available for limited times of the year.  If you’re in the mood for a cocktail, then you have to go to Thistle.  Other great places to enjoy a cocktail is at Nick’s, The Barberry, Pura Vida, and La Rambla.

Take advantage of the amazing restaurants!  Fine dining in the area includes Bistro Maison, Nick’s, Tha7b82faaa1d49b0795d454f11fc64c5ce Painted Lady, Joel Palmer House, Tina’s, Recipe, The Barberry, Thistle, La Rambla and many more. If you’d like a less formal dining experience, there is always Golden Valley, Valley Commissary, Grain Station, The Blue Goat, and Pura Vida.

Besides libations and food, there are many more things to discover in this area.  Want to go shopping? McMinnville’s main street captures the feeling of the main streets of old with a variety of local stores, shops, tasting rooms and music. Carlton is home to many tasting rooms that include producers from other Oregon wine growing regions. McMinnville is also home to Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum, one of the top ten airplane museums in the world.

With all of these things for you to enjoy, it’s hard to believe your only an hour south of Portland, less than an hour from the coast, and two hours from the snowy slopes of Mt. Hood.  So if you thought that wine touring in the Willamette Valley was only a summer time activity, think again. Don’t let our light rain deter you, come for the wine and food, and take advantage of all Oregon has to offer year-round.

November Wine Touring in the Willamette Valley

November 16th, 2015 by Nicolette Bailey

Is thGregor Halenda Travel Oregon Jessis a good time to go wine touring in Oregon?  November wine touring in the Willamette Valley is a great time to taste Pinot Noirs. There are over 300 tasting rooms throughout the valley, and most all of them are open through the Thanksgiving weekend. Additionally, most of us in the valley are releasing new wines, having pick-up parties, wine club events, and winemaker dinners throughout the months of November and December. It is a great time to be out in wine country, celebrating the bountiful harvest.

With the holidays approaching, it is a great time to stock up on your party wines and dinner wines for the festive season. Many wineries offer wine specials during this time of year.

When you’re traveling through Oregon’s Wine Country, the restaurants in the area offer great dining experiences. Which dining experience is best for you? Ask around and be prepared to have a lot of options. To make your wine tasting tours easier there are several touring businesses to drive you from tasting room to tasting room. Most also offer dinner service, which is a ride to and from dinner.Fall vineard

It used to be that the “season” for tasting in Willamette Valley wine country was from Memorial Weekend until Thanksgiving. Today the “season” is all year long as many wineries are open for tasting, restaurants are open for lunch and dinner, and warm and cozy B&Bs are open to with nice fireplaces to cuddle up and enjoy that bottle of Oregon Pinot. Even after the holidays, there are plenty of places to go, wines to taste, and places to stay and eat. In January, the Oregon Truffle Festival takes place. In February, there are many Valentine events. And as March rolls around, white wines for spring and summer begin to be released.

There is never a “closed” time in the Willamette Valley.

Bottling 2014 Pinot Noir in the Willamette Valley

November 2nd, 2015 by Nicolette Bailey

IMG_1059When do we bottle Pinot Noir in Willamette Valley? It’s about this time of year when Oregon Wineries move the previous year’s harvest from barrels to bottles. This is a great time to revisit last year’s harvest, and explore this wine after it’s spent some time in the barrel. 2014 was a rare year for Oregon Pinot Noir. Across the board, Willamette Valley vineyards harvested not only a large quantity of fruit, but more importantly the harvested fruit was of a high quality. All too often one is sacrificed for the benefit of the other, but not in 2014. That year began with an early spring that continued into warmer than normal weather throughout the growing season. This combination brought in a harvest two to three weeks earlier than normal, a time of year that saw very little precipitation. Often times, late in the growing season, vineyards are at the mercy of the weather, hoping for enough dry days to pick ripe fruit. As a combined result, the 2014 wines in barrel are showing ripe, voluptuous body and weight.

Bottling Pinot Noir in the Willamette Valley typically takes place right before harvest in late August and September. The machines used to bottle wine are large, and require specially trained operators. Because of this, a lot of smaller wineries hire a mobile botting unit. When it is time for bottling the mobile unit is pulled to the winery.DSCN1218

Once bottled, the wine is left to age in bottle for at least another 6 months before release. However, Youngberg Hill typically release our Pinot Noirs 2 years after the fruit was harvested, so don’t expect to see these wines before November of 2016. At Youngberg Hill, our Pinot Noirs are bigger and bolder than most of the other wines produced in the valley. Because of this, we give them more time in the barrel. We normally keep our Pinot Noir in barrel for at least 12 months or more. With the 2014 vintage being special, we will hold the wine in our French White Oak barrels for 14 months. This additional time in the barrel will impart more of the oak flavor, complementing the bigger fruit flavor of the 2014 harvest. We believe this will ultimately create a superb and well balanced Pinot Noir.

 

blog action photo tasting room sing

Making White Wines in The Willamette Valley

October 19th, 2015 by Nicolette Bailey

IMG_2086What is the difference between making white wines or red wines in the Willamette Valley? The main difference is that rather than leaving the juice from the grape on the skins after destemming, whites wines typically are not destemmed and the grapes juice is immediately pressed off the skins, stems, and seeds. Second, while red wine is fermented over a 12 to 14 day period at warm temperatures (75 to 80 degrees), white wines are typically fermented over a longer period, 30 plus days, at cooler temperatures around 60 degrees. Red wines are also typically fermented to dry meaning all the sugar has been converted to alcohol. With white wines, that could vary significantly from a very sweet wine (stopping fermentation before the sugar is all converted) all the way to bone dry (no residual sugar).

Depending on the varietal, white wines may go directly from stainless steel tanks to bottle within four months or go into barrel for several months before bottling. For example, our Pinot Gris goes directly from tank to bottle and is released about six months after harvest. Our Pinot Blanc goes into neutral oak barrels for a couple of months just to allow the wine to age a little more. Our Chardonnay is put in once used barrels for six to eight months to provide some slight oak character while retaining all the fruit profile. They process isn’t done just in the Willamette Valley but are standard practices in the wine industry.

blog action photo tasting room sing

7 Ways You Can Add Organic Charm to Your Wine Country Wedding

September 1st, 2015 by Rachel

 Wine Country WeddingWe are sure you’ve seen all of the amazing boho-chic and rustic organic charm featured in Pinterest weddings. You have also probably seen the “Pinterest fails” when someone tries to duplicate the beautiful photos and projects featured on that popular website. In this article, we have compiled seven beautiful ideas that will add organic charm to your Willamette Valley wedding. We have seen these ideas in action, so we know you won’t have to take a “fail” picture when using them in your wedding.

1 – Incorporate seasonal flowers. A spring/early summer wedding may bloom with soft pink peonies and roses while a summer wedding can feature glorious dahlias and sunflowers. Using seasonal flowers can only enhance the natural surroundings found here in Oregon Wine country.Wine Country Wedding


2 – Speaking of flowers… think about where you want the flowers.
When we think about boho-chic weddings or weddings with an organic feel, we usually think about flower crowns adorning the bride’s hair, trailing bouquets, and flowers in containers big and small. While you may think to just adorn everything with flowers, that can get pretty expensive. So, consider how and where you’d like to place the flowers so that you get the biggest bang for your buck.

3 – The cake can be anything from crazy creative or super au naturel. Generally, organic or rustic weddings have a cake that either looks like a flower or has flowers involved in the decoration. The other side of the boho/organic coin is to have a very plain looking layered cake. If you want the flower look, but don’t want to actually eat petals, you may want to look at silk flower cake toppers or other faux flower decorations.

Wine Country Wedding4 – Decorations can be creative. Organic weddings have a flowy, wild garden, and vintage feel. This means you can use your imagination when decorating. Think about different fillers you can use. Some ideas include hay, snapdragons, rosemary, feathers, wildflowers, or thistle. Also, look at materials like lace and burlap to decorate your chairs or vases. You can have a ton of fun decorating for your wine country wedding.

5 – Mismatching is okay. We have seen more and more couples use adorably mismatched vases and mason jars, wood and metal buckets, fun wood signs, and more. When you go for a boho-chic look, mismatching goes with the overall look.

Willamette Valley Wedding6 – You aren’t stuck with a traditional dress or only wearing white. Modern brides are not stuck with pure white, traditionally cut dresses. Wedding dresses can be any color and any style.  Pick the dress and color that makes you feel gorgeous and you have your wedding dress!

7 – Have fun with it! Pinterest weddings are always gorgeous, but this is your wedding. You and your partner are celebrating your unique and one-of-a-kind love. So, don’t feel restricted by Pinterest or a set theme. Create your own beauty and we guarantee your wedding will be just as wonderful as your love for one another.

We hope our tips have helped you as you plan your big day!Willamette Valley Wedding