Posts Tagged ‘Youngberg Hill’

Biking and Hiking in Oregon Wine Country

June 20th, 2014 by Rachel

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Summertime is the perfect time for biking and hiking in Oregon wine country — especially right here in the Willamette Valley and surrounding areas.  Flowers are blooming, birds are singing, and the vines are starting to produce.  This countryside is absolutely stunning in the summertime.

 

 

Hiking

There is hiking throughout McMinnville and the Willamette Valley.  You can head north to the Rotary Nature Preserve at Tice Park for a walk along Beaver Creek or travel over to Our Lady of Guadalupe Trappist Abbey for exploring and hiking.  There are a ton of parks in McMinnville proper that you can take advantage of as well.  Just a couple of these are: Joe Dancer Park and Wortman Park.

The area surrounding our fair city also gives visitors plenty of opportunities for hiking.  There are trails around nearby Erratic Rock in Sheridan, not to mention all the hiking and biking which can be done at Champoeg State Park.

Not only are there native wetlands, rivers, glacial rocks, and more to be seen in several of these parks, bird watchers can scope out the skies for local birds.  We work hard to keep our vineyard in harmony with nature – and our communities work hard to maintain the natural beauty and balance of these parks and spaces.

Biking

Not only do we at Youngberg Hill offer a fantastic bike tour package which covers bike rentals, a two night stay, breakfast, wine tastings, and a picnic lunch; our local community offers a ton of additional trails for the avid cyclist.

Oregon is bike country.  We take pride in providing spaces for bikes to cycle in our roadways and bike paths through a variety of parks – like Champoeg.  Additionally, the state of Oregon has created a variety of scenic bikeways, all of which are within a day’s drive or less of our winery and inn.

Our area has at least 150 wineries within biking distance from Youngberg Hill alone.  This means you can take a day to conduct your own bike tasting itinerary – starting from the Hill and working out.

Red wine is heart healthy – and so are these activities.  We hope you have a chance to enjoy our beautiful valley in more ways than one!

 

Do You Have to Let Your Wine Breathe?

June 17th, 2014 by Rachel

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Most of us opening a bottle of wine want to drink it right away.

 

Our faces might look like those of Marshall and Lily in “How I Met Your Mother” when they are told they have to wait 30 minutes to let their wine breathe.

 

 

So, the real question is – do you have to let your wine breathe?

First of all, it’s always up to your taste.  If you open a bottle, pour the wine into a glass and decide “Hey, this is delicious” then don’t let us stop you.  It’s that famous “yuck or yum” factor Wayne always talks about.

But, if you’re wondering why you’d let a wine breathe and how this action will affect taste, read on.

“Letting your wine breathe” is a pretty simple process.  The idea is that, a young red wine or even a mature red wine need to be mixed with air for a short period of time (meaning about 1-2 hours for a young wine and around 30 mins for a mature wine) in order to allow the wine to achieve its full aromatic and flavor potential.  Note that very old wine, whites, or champagne don’t need to breathe.  They can be drunk right away.

A common mistake made in letting your wine breathe is simply popping the cork and letting the wine bottle sit out for a while.  This doesn’t actually let the air mix in with much wine at all.  Your best option is decanting the wine in a decanter.  But you don’t have to get that complicated.  You can simply pour your wine into your glass, swirl it around, and then let it sit for a short period of time.

Finally – don’t let your wine sit too long.  If you’re planning on drinking one bottle over an entire evening, it may be a good idea to simply decant by the glass.  You don’t want your wine to turn vinegary.

As with everything in the wine world, letting your wine breathe is a choice that you should make only if it’s something that improves the taste of your wine to your palate.  It’s all about the yuck and yum.  Enjoy your wine in the way that tastes best to you!

 

 

 

 

How to Make Your Wine Country Wedding Unique

June 10th, 2014 by Rachel

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A wine country wedding is always a unique and beautiful affair.  There are a million photo ops among the vines, the setting is simply fantastic, and of course the wine you serve will be superb.  But what can you do to make your wedding even more unique?  Here are a few fun ideas:

1. Have your guests sign a wine bottle. With metallic sharpies and other permanent markers, it’s pretty simple to use a wine bottle as an alternative guest book – or as an accompaniment to your guest book.

2. Choose local.  This may not be a destination wedding for you.  Perhaps you live in the breathtaking beauty that is Oregon wine country. However, your guests are probably not all locals.  Finding fun and appropriate gifts or accents for your wedding that really speak to the place can help you stand out.  You can pair local cheeses or fruits with the wine you serve, provide local jam or candies as your gift to your guests, or ask your florist to create bouquets and center pieces with local flowers.

3. Take advantage of your landscape.  Wine country has a very specific feel.  There are farming and earthy elements to play with as well as the class people naturally associate with wine itself.  Play off of this with the decorations you use throughout your wedding.  Incorporate wine barrels, wine bottles, wine glasses, and/or wine corks into your wedding decorations.

4. Add a little extra wine to your ceremony or the celebration afterwards.  A couple of ideas are:

  • You and your partner can pour wine from two decanters into one glass and drink from the glass.
  • Another idea is: You and your partner can write love letters, add them to a box carrying a bottle of wine that will age well and pledge to open the box, read the letters and drink the wine in a set amount of years.  We have a friend who did this and one of her guests built the box for her and her husband.  The letters and wine are waiting for their 10 year anniversary.

5. Remember that it’s a celebration!  Many brides get mired down in the details of their wedding.  While this is completely understandable, remember this is a celebration of your love.  Be sure to inject your own personality into your wedding and make it uniquely you.

Oregon wine country is one of the most beautiful places to have a wedding – and Youngberg Hill is particularly gorgeous because we have amazing views along with our vineyard.  Take advantage of the natural beauty surrounding your wedding and infuse it with your joy.  Cheers to you and your partner!

 

Four Tips for Planning Your Destination Elopement

May 20th, 2014 by Rachel

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You and your partner have decided: you’re getting married.  There’s no need for a big wedding, it would be more fun to get hitched away from all that stress.  Even better, you’re getting married at a destination of your choice.  This opens up the option of honeymooning at your marriage location.

We understand your needs here at Youngberg Hill. That’s why we provide services for just such an occasion.  Even though you’re not having “the big wedding,” there is still planning involved in an elopement. Here are are four tips for planning your perfect destination elopement.

Tip 1: Location is important.

Whether you will be honeymooning at your marriage location or not, it’s important that you find the spot that you will remember forever.  Even though this is not a huge wedding with a reception, catering, and crowds, you and your significant other will remember these moments for the rest of your lives.  So, pick a place that you will love to remember – together.

That brings us to the next tip:

Tip 2: Be sure to get a great photographer.

Your marriage location may be able to recommend some great, local photographers, or perhaps you can find someone on your own for your special day.  Either way, remember that you are only sharing this day with your partner.  No one else will be around to snap candid moments or grab Uncle Bill’s camera for a few shots.  You will want a professional you can trust to capture the moments of your marriage so you can your partner can look back on this special day and smile together.

Tip 3: Don’t forget the marriage license!

Here in Yamhill county there are specific requirements for obtaining a marriage license.  One such requirement is a waiting period which may be waived for a fee.  There’s also an age requirement (18 years of age, 17 if a parent or guardian gives consent.)  It’s really simple to obtain a marriage license here, so be sure to get one before the elopement.

Tip 4: Do something special post-marriage.

There won’t be any big reception, cake cutting, or bouquet toss after your nuptials.  That doesn’t mean you can’t celebrate!  Whether you head out for dinner, share a bottle of wine, or have a giant party when you get home, be sure to do something fantastic to celebrate the amazing, life-long commitment you both just made.

An elopement is incredibly personal and special.  Here’s to yours being the perfect day to start the rest of your lives together!

 

 

Looking for Youngberg Hill Wines?

February 26th, 2014 by Nicolette Bailey

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If you aren’t able to visit us at Youngberg Hill to enjoy our wines in person, here is a list of retail shops where you can find our wine.  If these shops are inconvenient to you, we are happy to ship direct to wherever you are.  If the store listed doesn’t have our wine in stock, ask them to order it in as it is available to them.

Of course if you are in the area, we would love for you to visit our tasting room on the Hill, and sample all of the vintages of Youngberg Hill wines we have to offer.  We’ve recently added a beautiful deck, and the view is outrageous!

 

Portland, OR ( and surrounding area) – Korkage, Primrose & Tumbleweeds, Lamb’s Stroheckers, Fred Meyer – Burlingame, Whole Foods – Bridgeport, Blackbird Wine Shop, Wine Up, Whole Foods – Tanasbourne, New Seasons, QFC -Stadium

Eugene, OR – Sundance

Jacksonville, OR- Corks, Jacksonville Inn, & Chateaulin-Ashland

Bend, OR- Rays-Sisters, Good Drop Wine Shop, Wine Shop next to 900 Wall

Salem,OR- Roth’s

Oregon Coast – Cellar on 10th in Astoria, Wine Shack in Cannon Beach

Seattle, WA – Wine World & Bottlehouse.

Minnesota- Byerly’s ( Burnsville, Golden Valley, Maple Grove and Ridgedale),  Excelsior Vintage, Lake Wine and cheese Shop, Lund’s Plymouth, Lund’s Wine & Spirits Downtown, Mike’s Liquor, North Loop wine and Spirits, Skyway Wine & Spirits, Mike’s Liquor, North Loop Wine and Spiritis, Skyway Wine & Spirits, Sorella Wine & Spirits, Thomas Liquors, Wine & Spirits at 7 & 41, Zipps Liquors.

Chicago – Wine Knows, Everetts Liquor, The Noble Grape (will special order), Five Forks Market All Wined Up, Select Beverages, The Tasting Room and City Winery.

 

Willamette Valley Geology 101 | Youngberg Hill

January 6th, 2014 by Nicolette Bailey

dirt 2As farmers, we wine grape growers have a strong interest in the soils our vines are planted in. When we explain to guests the different characteristics of our soils, we are often asked how the soils got there and why they are so different from one another. During such a discussion with some recent guests, we were fortunate to have among them a geologist who was visiting.  He not only took a strong interest in our explanation, but had additional information to share as well.  For all of our “dirt-geek” readers, and for those who just want to learn more, his research points can be read in the following pdf .  We are thankful to have such interested and passionate guests who want to join the discussion about wine farming, and welcome your comments on the topic of soil in the Willamette Valley!

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2013 Oregon Wine Vintage in Review

December 16th, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

Harvest 2013 104Oh what a beautiful October we had!  Many wine grape growers in the area say that September weather determines how good of a year we have for the vintage. I believe that October tells a good story of vintage quality but its not the whole story. While much of the ripening takes place in September, October is when everything comes together.

2013 Oregon wine vintage was no exception. The growing season started early with an early spring, and that timing continued throughout the season. The summer proved to be a little warmer than normal which also had things moving along a little faster. The combination resulted in ripening happening in warmer conditions, moving sugars and acids ahead of other ripening factors, which may throw the resulting wines out of balance. This caused some farmers to become concerned that the grapes were going to need to be harvested early and that the resulting wines would be high in alcohol.

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Hostesses with the Mostesses

November 3rd, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

InnkeepersMost of our guests and everyone in the Willamette Valley will agree that our most distinguishing feature is our extraordinary panoramic views from atop the Hill. However, I suggest that our Innkeepers, Becky and Colleen, may be our most distinguishing feature. While our guests always leave mesmerized by their experience with us, it is the personal care that Becky and Colleen take with each and every guest that truly sets us apart.

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MEET ARCHER! Oregon Dog Adoption at its best

October 20th, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

Oregon dog adoptionA few weeks after losing our beloved dog Holly to cancer, we decided to look for a new friend for Dale, and gave dog adoption a try.  Dale really missed Holly and spent every day sad and moping.  The girls wanted a puppy, as they had never had one.   We started looking for a good, mixed breed puppy, but didn’t have much luck.  While researching online, Wayne discovered that the local animal shelter had a dog available for adoption that looked interesting – Archer, a one year old male Queensland Heeler, who was supposed to be good with kids and friendly.

I went to the animal shelter with the kids to visit Archer, and we brought along a list of characteristics that we hoped to find in our ideal new pet:  no jumping or barking as we walked by, no jumping on or pushing over the children, must play well with other dogs, cows, and cats, and must not be afraid of people.  To our surprise, Archer passed all the initial tests!  We adopted Archer, brought him home, and saw that he had potential.  He loves Dale and like any younger dog is driving him crazy with all of his puppy energy.

Dale is now running the property like he used to with Holly.  Archer is very good with the girls and other dogs, and loves car rides.  He is learning to leave the cows alone, but the cats haven’t been so lucky.  Perhaps Archer is trying to herd them, or maybe he just wants to play, but since he has been here our 5 cats have been hard to find.  If anyone knows how to stop dogs from chasing cats, we would love to hear about it!  We hope that you can come up and visit Archer and enjoy the paradise that he lives in.
~Nicolette

 

Take a Hike! Hiking Oregon

August 26th, 2013 by Nicolette Bailey

orThe state of Oregon has a vast array of nature recreation opportunities, and each region of the state has its own special, natural qualities.  If you are visiting Oregon from another country or another US State and are interested in taking a hike on your trip, or if you are an Oregon local who is looking for suggestions for getting out into nature this summer, now is the time to start planning, and this page can be a good starting point for you! Hiking Oregon offers so many choices for all kinds of ability levels.  This blog will be focused on the Willamette Valley Wine Country, Portland and Salem areas.

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